Self Fertilization

What is Self Fertilisation?

The uniting of male and female gametes and/or nuclei from the same haploid, diploid, or polyploid organism is known as selfing or self-fertilisation. It's a case of excessive inbreeding. From unicellular creatures to the most complex hermaphroditic plants and animals, selfing is common (especially invertebrates). Selfing can happen in unicellular organisms like Protozoa when two individuals (or their cell nuclei) that were formed from a previous mitotic division of the same individual interbreed. 

Selfing plants account for about 10-15% of all blooming plants. Some hermaphrodite animals reproduce by self-fertilization on a regular basis. Selfing is more prevalent in adverse environmental conditions or the absence of a partner in other species; in such species, selfing is more common in bad environmental conditions or the absence of a mate.


Self-Fertilization in Plants

Selfing is a term that is frequently used as a synonym for self-pollination, although it also refers to various types of self-fertilization in plants and animals.

Self-pollination occurs when pollen from the same plant lands on the stigma of a flower (in blooming plants) or the ovule (in non-flowering plants) (in gymnosperms). Pollen is transferred from the anther of one flower to the stigma of another flower on the same flowering plant, or from microsporangium to ovule within a single (monoecious) gymnosperm in autogamy; in geitonogamy, pollen is transferred from the anther of one flower to the stigma of another flower on the same flowering plant, or from microsporangium to ovule within a single (monoecious) gymnosperm Flowers that do not open (cleistogamy) or stamens that move to come into touch with the stigma are examples of autogamy processes in plants.


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Occurrence: Few plants pollinate themselves without the help of pollen carriers (such as wind or insects). The mechanism is most commonly seen in legumes like peanuts. The blooms of another legume, soybeans, bloom during the day and stay open to insect cross-pollination. If this isn't done, the flowers will self-pollinate as they close. Orchids, peas, sunflowers, and tridax are just a few of the plants that may self-pollinate. The majority of self-pollinating plants have small, inconspicuous blooms that release pollen straight onto the stigma before the bud opens. Self-pollinated plants use less energy to produce pollinator attractants and can thrive in environments where the insects and other animals that would visit them are sparse or non-existent, such as the Arctic or at high altitudes.

Self-pollination reduces the number of offspring available and may reduce plant vigour. Self-pollination, on the other hand, has the potential to benefit plants by allowing them to extend beyond the range of acceptable pollinators or generate offspring in locations where pollinator populations have been substantially reduced or are naturally changeable.


Types of Self-Pollinating Plants

Unless there is a mechanism to prevent it, both hermaphrodite and monoecious species have the potential for self-pollination and self-fertilization. Eighty percent of flowering plants are hermaphroditic, which means they have both sexes in the same flower, whereas only 5% are monoecious. As a result, the remaining 15% would be dioecious (each plant unisexual). Orchids and sunflowers are two examples of self-pollinating plants. Self-pollination and cross-pollination are both possible for dandelions.

Advantages: Self-pollinating flowers provide a number of advantages. For starters, if a genotype is well-suited to a certain habitat, self-pollination aids in the maintenance of this characteristic in the species. Because it is not reliant on pollinating agents, self-pollination can occur when bees and wind are unavailable. When the number of flowers is limited or they are spaced widely, self-pollination or cross-pollination can be beneficial. Pollen grains are not transported from one flower to another during self-pollination. As a result, there is less pollen waste. Self-pollinating plants also do not require external pollinators.

Disadvantages: Self-pollination has a number of drawbacks, including a lack of variation that prevents adaptability to changing environmental conditions or disease attack. Self-pollination can promote inbreeding depression because of the expression of detrimental recessive mutations, or diminished species health due to the breeding of closely related specimens. This is why many flowers with the capacity to self-pollinate have a built-in mechanism to prevent it, or at the very least make it a second choice. Genetic recombination cannot erase genetic abnormalities in self-pollinating plants, and children can only avoid acquiring the harmful traits through a fortuitous mutation in a gamete.


Self-Fertilization in Animals

Hermaphroditism is a condition in which a single animal possesses both male and female reproductive systems. Hermaphroditic invertebrates include earthworms, slugs, tapeworms, and snails. Hermaphrodites can self-fertilize, but they usually mate with another member of their species, fertilising and creating offspring together. Barnacles and clams, for example, are more likely to self-fertilize because they have limited movement or are not motile. Because self-fertilization is an extreme form of inbreeding that usually results in less fit offspring, many species have measures in place to avoid it.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

1. Is Self-Fertilization Seen in Earthworms?

Ans. Hermaphrodites are earthworms. In the same body, they create eggs and sperm. However, they are unable to reproduce through self-fertilization. This is due to the fact that the male and female sex organs mature at distinct times.

2. How Do Snails Prevent Self-Fertilization?

Ans. Snails exchange spermatophores, which are bundles of sperm injected into a snail, to prevent self-fertilization. Copulation may occur if a land snail is able to find a compatible companion.

3. Does Self-Fertilization Increase Diversity?

Ans. Snails exchange spermatophores, which are bundles of sperm injected into a snail, to prevent self-fertilization. Copulation may occur if a land snail is able to find a compatible companion.

4. What are the Advantages of Cross-Fertilization?

Ans. The following are some of the benefits of cross-pollination: The resulting offspring are healthier. Cross-pollination of two variations of the same species or two species might result in new kinds. The seeds produced are plentiful and fertile.