Amino Acid Formula

Amino Acid Chemical Formula

Amino acids are organic compounds that comprise functional groups: of amino, i.e., – NH2, and carboxyl, i.e., – COOH, along with a side chain (R or alkyl group) specific to each amino acid group. So, the key elements in an amino acid formula are carbon (C), hydrogen (H), oxygen (O), and nitrogen (N). Besides this, the side chains of amino acids are attached with other elements.

Amino acids have a specific amino formula, which we will discuss on this page, along with the structural formula of basic amino acids.


Amino Acid Molecular Formula 

Amino Acid formula is also known as the Saltpeter formula or Nitrate of potash formula.

The amino acid molecular formula is H2NCHRCOOH in most cases, where R is an organic substituent known as a "side chain." 

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Amino Acid Structure

Below is the structural formula of basic amino acid along with the labelling of each group:

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In the above structural formula of basic amino acid,  an amino acid group formula consists of a central carbon atom, also known as the alpha (α) carbon. This central carbon atom is attached to an amino group (NH2), a carboxyl group (COOH), and a hydrogen atom.

Also, all the amino acids differ from each other in the particular chemical structure of the R (alkyl) group.


Amino Group Formula

Amino group formula is divided into the following three categories:

  • Essential amino acids group formulas

  • Conditional amino acid group formulas

  • Non-essential amino acid group formulas

Now, let’s have a look at the amino acid group formulas one-by-one:


Essential Amino Acid Group Formulas


Types of Amino Acids 

Amino Acid Chemical Formula

Molecular Weight

Histidine

C6H9N3O2

155.157 g/mol

Isoleucine

C6H13NO2

131.17 g/mol

Leucine

C6H13NO2

131.17 g/mol

Lysine

C6H14N2O2

146.19 g/mol

Methionine

C5H11NO2S

146.21 g/mol

Phenylalanine

C9H11NO2

165.19 g/mol

Threonine

C4H9NO3

119.1192 g/mol

Tryptophan

C11H12N2O2

204.23 g/mol

Valin

C5H11NO2

117.151 g/mol


Conditional Amino Acid Group Formulas


Conditional Amino Acids Groups

Amino Acid Chemical Formula

Molecular Weight

Arginine

C6H14NO2

174.2 g/mol

Cysteine

C3H7NO2S

121.16 g/mol

Glutamine

C5H10N2O3

146.14 g/mol

Tyrosine

C9H11NO3

181.19 g/mol

Glycine

C2H5NO2

75.07 g/mol

Orthinine

C5H12N2O2

132.16 g/mol

Proline

C5H9NO2

115.13 g/mol

Serine

C3H7NO3

105.09 g/mol


Non-Essential Amino Acid Group Formulas


Non-essential Amino Acids Groups

Amino Acid Chemical Formula

Molecular Weight

Alanine

C3H7NO

89.09 g/mol

Asparagine

C4H8N2O3

132.12 g/mol

Aspartic acid

C4H7NO4

133.11 g/mol

Glutamic acid

C5H9NO4

147.13 g/mol


Amino Acid Baby Formula

Amino acid baby formula, for instance, Neocate, is milk-free. It is made up of non-allergenic amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein, which means that there is little chance of a child being exposed to an allergic reaction to them, however, a typical allergic reaction is a reaction to protein.


Amino Acid Formula Milk

Amino acid formula milk is a sort of infant milk formula produced using individual amino acids. 

It is hypoallergenic and planned for newborn children experiencing a serious allergy to milk and different gastrointestinal conditions, for instance, protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and malabsorption syndromes.


Conclusion

The amino acid is an organic compound that comprises functional groups of amine and carboxyl along with a side chain that is specific to each amino acid. The key elements are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

Q1: When Were Amino Acids Discovered?

Ans: Amino acids were discovered in 1806. Two French chemists named  Pierre Jean Robiquet and Louis-Nicolas Vauquelin cocooned a compound in asparagus which was consecutively named asparagine, the first-ever discovered amino acid.


Later on,  glycine from gelatin, cysteine was discovered from urinary stones and leucine from muscle and wool.

Q2: State Applications of Amino Acids in Biodegradable Plastics.

Ans: Amino acids have been considered as parts of biodegradable polymers, which have applications as harmless to the ecosystem bundling and in medication in drug conveyance and the development of prosthetic inserts. 


An intriguing illustration of such materials is polyaspartate, a water-dissolvable biodegradable polymer that may have applications in disposable diapers and agribusiness.

Q3: Are Amino Acids Alive?

Ans: Amino acids and protein are not alive, yet they copy and are a prerequisite for replication. 


In any case, DNA and protein go about as the data stockpiling and the living action of natural cells, utilize the RNA to adjust and duplicate.