Speech on India

Speech on India for Students in English

India is a country of diversified cultures and traditions. It is famous for its rich culture and heritage. One can have people of all castes and religions residing in this country with unity. On this page, we have provided a speech on India for students of all categories. We have provided a short speech and a 10 line speech for a better understanding of the students. This speech is written simply and thus will help the students to get an idea about our country, India.


Long Speech on India

A very warm welcome to all of your presents here. Today, I am here to deliver a speech on India. India, having the oldest civilization in the world, is one of the most diverse countries. It is famous for its rich culture, traditions and festivals. There are a total of  29 states in India and each state is rich in its own culture, festivals and cuisines. Therefore, the slogan ‘Unity in diversity’ sits perfectly with my country. You can find people of every caste, creed and religion here. India is the only country that has given birth to different Indian religions - Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, Sikhism and Christianity. Out of which, Hinduism and Buddhism are considered the third and fourth-largest religions of the world respectively.


India has the largest Constitution in the world which strongly follows secularism and equality. It has been celebrating 73 years of independence since 15th August 1947 with Ram Nath Kovind being the current President. He is the nominal executive head of the country who is responsible for protecting and preserving the Indian Constitution. On the other hand, the Prime Minister of India is considered the head of the Government and is responsible for the distribution of work to various ministries and offices. Narendra Damodardas Modi is the present Prime Minister of India. 


A federal form of government is followed in India, i.e., two different forms of Government-run the Constitution - the Central Government and the State Government. Apart from the President and Prime Minister, each state has its own Chief Minister who is responsible for the development of the assigned states. Being a secular and democratic country, India gives equal rights to all of its citizens to cast their votes for the government. 


Also known as Bharat or Hindustan, Hindi is the national language of my country. But, apart from Hindi, each state has its native language. The national song of India is Vande Mataram and Delhi is the capital city of the country, which itself holds rich cultures and history from Ancient India. India is also famous for its various historical monuments and architecture, which makes it a major tourist destination.


Over the years, India has been growing beautifully in various fields be it in Science, Technology, Agriculture, Sports or the Economy.  As a developing country, it stands 5th in the economy and is the 7th largest country in the world. To date, India is the second-largest producer of tea in the world after China. The massive production of Tea comes from the state of Assam which approximately produces 702 million kilograms of tea per year. 


India also has the largest textile producing industries including cotton, silk, synthetic fibres, jute and wool. Uttar Pradesh is India’s only state which is famous for being the largest producer of sugar in the country.  


Being a citizen of this country, I feel immensely proud to see India grow in the field of economy and industry every year. Lastly, I would like to conclude my speech by saying that we, all the citizens of India, must come together in preserving the rich cultural heritage of our country. It is our sole responsibility to make India proud and help it grow globally. 


Short Speech

Heartiest welcome to everyone present here. I am thankful to get an opportunity to deliver a short speech on India. India being the seventh-largest country in the world is famous for its rich culture and heritage. India celebrated its 70 years of democracy on 26th January. It has the largest constitution in the world and strongly believes in its slogan ‘Unity in Diversity.


You can find people from various religions staying unitedly in this country. It takes pride in celebrating and respecting the festivals as well as the rituals of all the religions namely- Hinduism, Islam, Sikhism and Christianity. Celebrating 73 years of independence since 15th August 1947, India believes in secularism and gives equal rights to all the citizens of the country.  Ram Nath Kovind is the current President of India since 2017 and Narendra Modi is the 14th Prime Minister of India. 


India being a developing country has currently emerged in the field of economics, science, sports and technology. Apart from being the second-most populous country in the world, our country also stands 7th in industry and 5th in the economy. India has 29 states, with Delhi being the capital city of the country. Thus, we can say that India has a wide range of cuisines, festivals and diverse cultures making it a great tourist destination. 


Last but not the least, I would like to say that being a citizen of this country, I am extremely proud of my country India. Through my speech on India, I would like to convey to everyone the message - to love, respect and follow the rich cultures of your country. It is our responsibility to make our country proud. 


10 Lines Speech - My Country India Speech in English

  1. Hello everyone, a very warm welcome to all of you. 

  2. Today, I am here to deliver a speech on my country India. 

  3. India is the country where I was born. 

  4. It is the second-most populous country in the world and the seventh-largest country. 

  5. India is famous for its rich cultural heritage and diversity. 

  6. My country India is also known as Bharat or Hindustan and is a democratic country. 

  7. The main slogan of India is, ‘Unity in Diversity. 

  8. People from different religions stay in India - mainly Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, and Christians. 

  9. I am very proud of my motherland India. 

  10. As citizens of this country, we should respect its rich culture and try to make our nation proud.


About The Indian Flag

When our leaders unfurled the Indian Tricolour at the nation's capital, they created magnificent memories filled with colourful, radiating affection for the country.


The independence that is freedom is that of a state in which its citizens or population, or a portion of it, exercise self-government and societal sovereignty. It is the type of self-determination that concentrates on exercising authority over the population, establishing distinct territory, establishing self-ruling government, and attempting to be self-sufficient. In summary, it will be a self-sufficient state whose issues will be resolved independently and without interference.


In remembrance of the sacred Independence Day, India proclaims itself independent in all respects and is liberated from the chains of British oppression. A 200-year struggle with submission, pleading for mercy, and hope to live each day like a free bird, hope to win through all the fights, and eventually, hope to see the dawn of a rising sun in the nation – has caused India to learn how to fight back for any scenario that comes her way. If you attempt to assess India's and its women's strength, you will see that it equates to living with the discomfort of dipping a tea bag in a cup of boiling tea.


The history of India and its independence is an epic in the liberation struggle and a test of fate. Every year, at the start of a new era, India seeks to reveal itself in brilliant colours of grandeur, growth, and endurance. Dive deep into India's history to understand how our freedom warriors and sons of India fought for victory and envisioned a growing India to be an independent nation. Their selfless efforts have enabled us to live in a civilised society, where we may sleep soundly in our beds every night. It is an encouragement to all of our youngsters to have the bravery to religiously honour their birthright in this nation. The echoes of patriotic songs create the atmosphere of this day to remind India to have a distinct character.


With the raising of the tricolour, Bharat Mata is free of the clutches of the East India Company and British domination, and all that remains is our oneness - ultimate strength in diversity. Being a nation with many cultures and inspired by the legacies of great leaders such as Babu and Netaji, India appears to dominate and comprehend every circumstance in which it believes it can handle itself with proper means of being extreme or forceful. The elixir of equality and justice, which our leaders have disseminated across the country, appears to be the most significant phenomenon that India has ever faced.


As the nation's young, it is our primary obligation to sacrifice ourselves to help our mother India. On this day, we should pay genuine gratitude to mother India's millions of martyrs. The courageous souls and gallant troops, armed forces, police, and security forces who have dedicated their lives to contributing to and protecting our motherland should be compensated for their zealous service.


Securing its full independence from colonialists, this day holds immense importance in the hearts of Indian residents residing in every part of the world. As a national holiday, this day appears to have an ambience of hoisting the national flag at all institutions as well as in our homes, the exhibition of various art forms representing the tricolour, the organisation of various cultural programmes as a tribute, and the synchronisation of memories of India's partition.


On 15 August 1947, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, our former Prime Minister of India, unfurled the tri-coloured flag at the Lahori Gate at the Red Fort in New Delhi, India's capital. Not only our independence heroes but also our father of the nation, Bapu Ji, fasted in Calcutta and lived the life of a perfect saint, promoting khadi and devoting his time to prayers and rebelling against hate.


Once upon a time, India was known as Spiceland, a region known for its spices and masalas. With its enormous resources and minerals, India was once dubbed the most appealing country in the world. When the British arrived and shackled India, they began to exploit all of the resources and proceeded to gather all of these rich commodities back to their nation. They not only manipulated the regulations, but they also began to impose ownership on India and its policies. They operated according to their whims and fancies and began executing the divide and rule programme, which split India in two.


Every year, parades are held to pay honour to all freedom fighters and armed forces that guard and secure us from adversaries. As a result, on August 15th, we recall that as Indian citizens, it is our primary responsibility to maintain the qualities of a nation, to stand for a nation, to be for the nation, and to be of the nation. The youth, who are the pillars to sustain the qualities of tolerance, love, and peace, should have a common bond with the people and a strong desire to fight for our nation. Each of us should be encouraged to seek out Swadeshi attire and support the brotherhood and freedom of expression that our country has granted us. India's core rights and guiding values have always motivated us to feel proud to be Indian.


The most beloved character of this epoch is freedom. It's something we long for. On this auspicious day of independence, we all the sons of mother India strive to win since there are no losers on the battlefield. Let us commemorate the martyrs who have flown her flag aloft in saffron and bright green colours.


"If your blood doesn't rage, it's water going through your veins." "What is the flush of youth if it is not of service to the motherland?" - Chandra Shekhar Azad


Five significant characteristics that may help us comprehend modern India:

  • Its variety

  • Culture's breadth

  • A place for minorities

  • Its future is dependent on the interplay of two worlds

  • Poverty, spirituality, and modernization coexist in urban and rural India.

Many people in the Western world regard India as a sterile and remote (conglomeratio) of people and poverty, a mix of the exotic and sad. This misunderstanding, which has been perpetuated by years of media caricature, conceals the truth.


In truth, India is a thriving society with a growing internal dynamic and a growing impact on the globe, both directly and indirectly. Its relevance stems not only from its size some 930 million Indians account for 15% of the global population but also from the problems highlighted by India's domestic and foreign policy choices. This country has the world's biggest functioning democracy, with regular and open elections. Thus, it is the litmus test for whether democracy is a fit form of governance for huge numbers of relatively poor people in a world where democracy, as we know it, is a critically endangered political species, particularly in Third World nations.


Modern India is also a litmus test for two middle-of-the-road ideologies. As an early proponent of non-alignment in international affairs, India has strived to carve out a (middle) ground between Western and (communist) governments. Over the years, its leadership in forging a Third World stance proved that there is a feasible path for governments that do not wish to take sides in Cold War politics, a strategy that many other nations in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East have followed and aspire to maintain.


India's economic policies have also pioneered new territory. They were the first large-scale test of the contemporary mixed economy, which combines central government planning with a mix of private and public ownership of economic companies. It is possible that evaluating the outcomes is still premature. On the one hand, poverty persists and unemployment is considerable. On the other hand, Indian agriculture has outperformed both Soviet and Chinese agriculture. (India currently feeds its people and has imported very little grain in the last four years.) In addition, India is presently the world's tenth-largest industrial economy. The geopolitics of South Asia add to India's relevance today. It is an important position in an era of oil logistics since it borders the Indian Ocean, into which the Persian Gulf flows.


Almost anything may be said about India and apply to some areas of the subcontinent. India is both a place of (poor) and, in other respects, a land of abundance. It is a nation that is both powerful and weak, old and contemporary, and has climatically striking differences. The name "India" indicates a unity that exists as a speculative political shape rather than as a human and socio-cultural reality. The merging of its complicated past with present society may be distilled into five significant elements that may help us comprehend modern India.


When thinking of India, the first thing that comes to mind is its diversity. It is a country with 15 official languages, around 300 minor languages, and about 3,000 dialects. Each of the twenty-four languages has over one million speakers. The most widely spoken language is Hindi, however, only over 40% of the population speaks it as their first language. Indians usually do not understand each other and rely on English as a connection or administrative language. However, language is not the only source of variation. There are four major social groups, known as castes, and thousands of sub-categories within the castes. Despite its Hindu majority, India is home to all of the world's main religions. Ethnic disparities are also prevalent. This mosaic is culturally significant. It is a cause of contention in a country where unique loyalties have deep spiritual and physical importance.


A second distinguishing aspect is the depth of culture, which contrasts with the nation's newness in its current shape. India has seen approximately 4,000 years of intellectual and cultural growth, dating back to the early Aryan culture. Hindu, Buddhist, Christian, Islamic, Sikh, and other influences have left strong impressions on culture since then. Every Indian, even the poorest illiterate, can narrate stories of myth and history, indicating an extraordinarily widespread awareness of a tremendous civilizational past. However, there was no India as we know it before the country's independence in 1947. Previously, there were several fragmented (some very huge) regions. Numerous of them were included in the British Indian Empire, which combined direct British control with oversight of many territories governed by traditional princes and local monarchs or maharajas.


India's contemporary state is just 34 years old, and its growth must be understood in the context of attempting to impose a national framework on ancient cultural traditions. The awareness of the magnificent past and the novelty of the present can occasionally result in an abrasive reaction.


The third distinguishing aspect is that India is a country of minorities. Hindus make up around 80% of the population. However, Hinduism is a mash-up of heterogeneous ideas and forms, frequently having contradictory components. An extra 12% are Muslims who are passionately committed to their faith. Hindu, Urdu, Bengali, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Punjabi, and other languages have their minorities. There are almost 40 million tribal and neo-aboriginal peoples in the world. No candidate for political office may be successful unless he or she is aware of these constituencies. This, in turn, influences both internal and international policy.


A fourth aspect of contemporary India is that its future is largely dependent on the interplay of two worlds: urban India, home to 20% of the people, and rural India, home to the remaining 60% of the population. The India of contemporary industry, national politics and foreign policy, government planning, the national media, major universities, business, the armed forces, science and technology is the India of urban India. Its greatest goods are usually as good as the best in the world, and it has a cosmopolitan outlook. Rural India is the India of time-honoured traditions, where tradition is the primary force of society, where foreigners come and go, but life goes on, sometimes with little change.


When the two Indias work well together, India succeeds, as in the spread of education, the elimination of illiteracy, the lengthening of the average lifespan, the implementation of some basic health care, and the maintenance of a democratic political system. India is in problems when they do not link successfully, as it is with population control and unemployment. The relationship between the two Indias must be extended and deepened if the country is to achieve its enormous potential.


The fifth and last point to remember is that in India, poverty, spirituality, and modernity coexist without the contradictory connotations that a Western viewpoint proposes. It is the core of Indian spirituality that allows even the most impoverished people to survive poverty, and it is modernity that brings hope for betterment.


This mentality, a synthesis of many modest individual thoughts and inspirations, characterises modern India and provides the best hope for the nation and its people.

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NCERT texts are recommended by the CBSE board. These books adhere to the most recent CBSE syllabus. As a result, these books are sufficient for test preparation. It straightforwardly discusses things. When it comes to improving your basics, these texts are the finest. It has a plethora of solved examples and activities that aid in a student's learning. The exam paper will be nearly entirely based on the NCERT textbook. As a result, pupils are recommended to extensively study the NCERT text.

3. What are the 5 important things about India?

Five significant characteristics that may help us comprehend modern India:

  • Its variety

  • Culture's breadth

  • A place for minorities

  • Its future is dependent on the interplay of two worlds

  • Poverty, spirituality, and modernization coexist in urban and rural India.


In truth, India is a thriving society with a growing internal dynamic and a growing impact on the globe, both directly and indirectly. Its relevance stems not only from its size—some 930 million Indians account for 15% of the global population—but also from the problems highlighted by India's domestic and foreign policy choices. This country has the world's biggest functioning democracy, with regular and open elections. Thus, it is the litmus test for whether democracy is a fit form of governance for huge numbers of relatively poor people in a world where democracy, as we know it, is a critically endangered political species, particularly in Third World nations.

4. What is the depth of culture in India?

A second distinguishing aspect is the depth of culture, which contrasts with the nation's newness in its current shape. India has seen approximately 4,000 years of intellectual and cultural growth, dating back to the early Aryan culture. Hindu, Buddhist, Christian, Islamic, Sikh, and other influences have left strong impressions on culture since then. Every Indian, even the poorest illiterate, can narrate stories of myth and history, indicating an extraordinarily widespread awareness of a tremendous civilizational past. However, there was no India as we know it before the country's independence in 1947. Previously, there were several fragmented (some very huge) regions. Numerous of them were included in the British Indian Empire, which combined direct British control with oversight of many territories governed by traditional princes and local monarchs or maharajas.

5. India is a country of minorities. Explain.

The third distinguishing aspect is that India is a country of minorities. Hindus make up around 80% of the population. However, Hinduism is a mash-up of heterogeneous ideas and forms, frequently having contradictory components. An extra 12% are Muslims who are passionately committed to their faith. Hindu, Urdu, Bengali, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Punjabi, and other languages have their minorities. There are almost 40 million tribal and neo-aboriginal peoples in the world. No candidate for political office may be successful unless he or she is aware of these constituencies. This, in turn, influences both internal and international policy.

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