Kinds of Adverbs

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In simple words, an adverb is a word that describes verbs. Adverbs are also used to add or modify the meaning of an adjective, a verb, a preposition, a sentence, a clause. We can add more information to the doing-words, using different kinds of adverbs. Hence, adverbs are a part of speech and express the manner, time, place, frequency, degree, and much more about a verb. They also act as a verb phrase which includes a verb and its dependents.

For example, 'A man is moving.'.

The sentence doesn't give us any information other than that there is a man who is moving, but if we add an adverb here and write:

 'A man is moving briskly.'; it shows that there is a man who is moving fast because maybe he is getting late for work or he has to go early.

Similarly, the sentence, 'You may sit.’, means that you can have a seat wherever you want. It doesn't give us any information about the place for you to sit. Whereas, the sentence, 'You may sit there.', means that there is a particular place to sit where you can find a seat. In this way, adverbs modify a sentence and make it more informative. So, we can say that adverbs describe a sentence or clause.


Different Types of Adverbs with Examples

Now, there are three kinds of adverbs, and they are as follows.

  • Simple adverbs

  • Interrogative adverbs

  • Relative adverbs

Let's look at the types of adverbs in detail.


Simple Adverbs

Simple adverbs contain only one word and they are the most used adverbs. Simple adverbs are further divided into many parts, and here are 6 types of adverbs under simple adverbs.


1. Adverb of Time

Whenever you want to add an information of 'when' to a verb, the adverb of time will be your answer. So, we can say that an adverb of time shows the time or moment of doing a task. For example, 

'I will go there tomorrow.'

So, if you ask me when I go? I will answer it by saying 'tomorrow'.

So, here, tomorrow is the adverb of time that provides an information regarding the time of the happening of an event.


2. Adverbs of Place

Whenever you want to add information of 'where' to a verb, the adverb of place will be your answer. So, we can say that an adverb of the place shows the place where the task is being done or has to be done. For example,

'You may sit there.'

So, if you ask where you may sit? The answer will be 'there'. So, here, 'there' is the adverb of time that shows the place of the happening of an event.


3. Adverbs of Frequency

Whenever you want to add an information regarding 'how often' to a verb, the adverb of frequency will be your answer. So, we can say that an adverb of the frequency shows the frequency with which the task has to be done. For example,

'I go for a walk daily.'

So, if you ask how often do I go for a walk? The answer will be 'daily'. So, here, 'daily' is the adverb of frequency that shows how often an event takes place.


4. Adverbs of Manner

Whenever you want to add information regarding 'how' or 'in what way', the adverb of manner will be used, so, we can say that an adverb of manner shows the form with which the task has to be done. For example,

'I speak beautifully.'

So, if you ask how do I speak? I will answer it by saying 'beautifully'. So, here, 'beautifully' is the adverb manner that shows how or in what way an event takes place.


5. Adverbs of Degree

Whenever you want to answer something starting from 'how much' or 'to what degree or extent', the adverb of degree will be your answer. So, we can say that an adverb of degree shows the degree or extent to which the task has been done. For instance:

'He is extremely talented.'

So, if you question me how often how much talent is he? I will answer it by saying 'extremely'. So, here, 'extremely' is the adverb of degree that shows with what degree an event takes place.


6. Adverb of Reason

Whenever you want to answer something, starting from 'why', the adverb of reason will be your answer. So, we can say that an adverb of the reason shows the reason behind doing a particular task. For instance:

'I go there because I love that place.'

So, if you question me, why do I go there? I will answer it by saying 'because I love the place'. So, here, 'because' is the adverb of the reason that shows why an event happens.


Interrogative Adverbs

Whenever you ask a question and the question word is used as an adverb, you are using interrogation adverbs. They possess a unique feature, and that is, they are placed at the beginning of a sentence.

For instance:

'Why do you talk to him?'

Here, 'why' is a question word used as an adverb. So, 'why' is an interrogation adverb.


Relative Adverbs

Whenever an adverb is used to relate or connect or join any two sentences, we use relative adverbs. These adverbs are just three- where, when, and why. For instance:

'I met him when no one was around.'

Here, when is the adverb which connects the two sentences that have I met him and No one was around. So, here, when is the relative adverb.

So, eight types of adverbs are mentioned here, which can be used anywhere to make the text more informative.