Courses
Courses for Kids
Free study material
Offline Centres
More
Store Icon
Store

Cowper's glands are found in which of the following organisms?
(a) Male mammals
(b) Female mammals
(c) Male amphibians
(d) Female amphibians

seo-qna
Last updated date: 20th Jun 2024
Total views: 403.8k
Views today: 4.03k
Answer
VerifiedVerified
403.8k+ views
Hint: Cowper’s gland is an important mucus-secreting gland. It is present near to the penis. The mucus is important for smooth ejaculation and lubrication during coitus.

Complete step by step answer:
Cowper's gland or bulbourethral gland is present beneath the prostate gland, on the internal tip of the penis, in male mammals. Female organisms or amphibians don't own this gland. The main function of this gland is to secrete thick mucus prior to ejaculation and to neutralize the traces of acidic urine in the urethra. Therefore, the answer is Cowper's glands are found in Male mammals.
So, the correct answer is, 'male mammals.'

Additional information: Let us know more about the Cowper's or bulbourethral gland:
- The Cowper's glands are a pair of glands shaped as pea, found posterolaterally to the membranous urethra.
- They secrete lubricating mucus secretion in the ejaculation.
- Embryologically they are formed from the urogenital sinus.
- The mucus secretion of Cowper's glands has various functions. Along with serving as a lubrication medium for the urethra and tip of the penis during coitus, it also expels traces of urine, dead cells, and mucous in the urethra for a clean pathway for ejaculation. The secretion also neutralizes the acidity caused by urine in the urethra.
- Here's the structure of Cowper's gland or bulbourethral gland for reference.

Note: Cowper's gland and bulbourethral gland are two names of the same gland. So, it shouldn't be confused if the later one is mentioned in the question instead of Cowper's gland. Bulbourethral glands were discovered by surgeon William Cowper, therefore it was named after him. anatomically, due to its location, it is called bulbourethral.