Russell's Viper

Classification of Russell Viper

Russell's viper is one of the most giant venomous snakes. It is a group of species consisting of the most poisonous snakes on the planet. It is from the family of Viperidae, which is native to the Indian subcontinent. George Shaw and Frederick Nodder were the first people to discover it. Russell's viper, also known as daboia, is the abundant and highly venomous terrestrial serpent of the Viperidae family. They are found from India to Taiwan in Java. It causes many snakebite deaths in humans, as they are mostly found beside the human settlements and farmlands and remain in regular contact with humans. They contribute to most of the deaths in India. The Russell's viper snakes are very aggressive and tend to bite as often as possible in their defense.

These vipers are characterized by a pair of long hollow venom injection Fangs attached to the movable part of their corporate job, which can be folded back in the mouth when not in use. They have vertical pupils, and their skills are keeled.

Vipera russelli is 5.5 feet in length and averages about 4 feet. These Indian Russell's viper is distributed throughout Asia. It has a triangular-shaped and flattened head which is quite distinct from the neck; the snout in front of the mouth is rounded, raised, and blunt. The nostrils are large, and the lower edge of the national scale touches the nasorostral scale. The crown of the head is covered with very distinctly fragmented scales and Larry regular. The scales are very narrow and are separated by 6 to 9 scales across the head and are single. Heads are quite large, and the colour is yellow or golden yellow and surrounded by 10 to 15 circumorbital scales. Three or four rows of sub oculars separate the eyes. The two maxillary bones support the fangs, and at most, they have six pairs of fangs at a time.


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Distribution and Habitat of Russell’s Viper

Vipera russelli is mainly found in the southeast Asia regions, including India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Pakistan. The species' population varies according to why Anna is considered a part of different species. In India, the most common place where this is found is in Punjab and Southern India, especially in Karnataka and from North to the Bay of Bengal. It is rare found these species in the Ganges valley, Northern Bengal and Assam. These species are not restricted to a particular habitat but are seen to avoid dense forests. The snake is usually found in open grassy areas and found in scrub jungles of forests and plantations, and farmlands. It is most common in the plains coastal areas and hills, which have a suitable habitat. It is generally not found in higher altitudes and humid environments such as mass forms and rainforests. These are abundant in highly urbanized areas in settlements in the countryside as they are attracted by the rodents found in settlements. As a result, this many of the victims of the snakes are from well-settled areas, but it is not closely associated with humans as cobras and kraits.

This species is primarily terrestrial and actively a nocturnal forager; however, it can alter its behaviour and become more active during the daytime in cooler temperatures. They are lazy animals and move slowly and sluggishly in nature unless pushed beyond a specific limit, after which they can be very aggressive as expected. When they are threatened, they form an s-shaped loop raising the upper one-third part of the body and produce a loud sound to scare off the predators. When they strike from this position, they can exert as much force as a significant individual can lift most of its body off the ground in this attacking position. These are powerful creatures and may react violently if being picked off; the bite may be a snap, or they can hold on for many seconds without leaving it.

The Russell's viper snakes don't have sensitive organs; they can read through thermal temperature and have special sensors to detect the position according to the temperature. The Identity of this organ is not specific, but the nerve endings in the supranasal sac resemble those heat-sensitive organs.


Reproduction and Life-Cycle of Russel’s Viper

This species is oviparous, and mating generally occurs during the year, although the females may conceive at any time of the year. The gestation period is more than six months for this species, and the young ones are hatched from May to November but mostly from July and June. It is an adamant breeder. All the fear of spring may occur as few as one litter of 20 to 40 are most common. The minimum length for a gravid female is about a hundred centimetres, and they gain sexual maturity by 2 to 3 years.


Food Habit

The preys of Russell's viper snakes mostly include rodents, although they can even feed on small reptiles, land crabs, scorpions, and other arthropods. Juveniles are crepuscular and can feed on lizards. As they grow and become adults, they begin to specialize in hunting rodents.

They have a fearsome reputation within the natural environment. They can mimic their appearance according to the environment and blend very well with the surroundings, so they are successful as a species.


Russell's Viper Bite

The venom of this species is delivered using solenoglyphous dentition, and the quality of this venom is produced quite considerably. Russell's viper bite is very dangerous. It can cause local haemorrhage at the bite site, cause internal bleeding, stop neurological signals and kill the victim. A single Russell viper's bite may contain about 130 to 250 mg of venom from an adult, while for the Juveniles, it is around 8 to 79 mg. The Russell's viper venom type is a neurotoxin. The site which this snake bites, the symptoms appear with the pain at the bite site, and the spelling of that affected region follows it. Bleeding is pretty standard, especially from the gums and urine. The sputum may show signs of blood within 20 minutes after the bite. In the most common cases, the blood pressure drops, the heart rate falls necrosis is usually superficial and limited to the muscles, which are nearer to the B and C can become severe; in extreme cases, vomiting and swelling of the face are also seen "one-third of the cases." If left untreated, kidney failure can also occur. In approximately 25 to 30% of Sivia, disseminated intravascular coagulation may occur in severe cases. Early medical treatment and applying the suitable anti-venom can prevent and drastically reduce the chance of lethal complications.

This venom costs the pituitary gland and can often result in hypopituitarism. It is very effective in inducing thrombosis, and it activates an x-factor which turns prothrombin to thrombin in the presence of factor VIII and phospholipid. When entered into the bloodstream can severely coagulate the blood, and thereby it can cause severe complications.


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The vipers of the most highly developed venom delivery apparatus. The venom gland is enormous and surrounded mainly by the temporal muscles, which consist of 2 bands that are superior arise from the file. The inferior one extends from the gland to the mandible.

The venom duct carries venom from the land to the funk invite words this groove is completely closed and form a hypodermic needle-like tube which is embedded inside the body of the prey when bitten they are enclosed within the mouth and gets open or and sealed in a thick folder mucous membranes during the movement. The movable maxillary bone connected with the transverse bone is put forward by the muscles and set in action by the opening of the mouth. Then the fan is directed, and the venom is discharged through it when the snake bites. This job closes, and the muscles surrounding the gland contract causing the venom to get ejected via the fangs.


Effect of Russell’s Viper Venom

The viper venom acts on the vascular system, which brings down the platelet counts and affects the blood by contributing towards the clotting in the pulmonary arteries. The action on the nervous system is not that great; the effect on respiration is not so direct. The influence on the circulation explains the venom's effect the most, which is the symptom of viperine envenomation. The pain is very severe around the wound, followed by discolouration and swelling of that affected area. The bite is followed by local pain, which is burning, and the limb soon swells up and becomes discoloured and within 1 to 3 hours, great prostration or cause, followed by vomiting and often diarrhoea. 


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The pulse becomes extremely feeble, and the onset of dyspnea and restlessness may be seen. These symptoms are mostly observed in cases of children, the pulse can become insignificant, and the extremities of the patient may become cold. 12 to 24 hours after the bites, these severe constitutional symptoms usually pass off, but in the meantime, the swollen area main spreads enormously. However, sudden death may occur due to severe depression, and they are not that common or infrequent in some parts of the continent; also, many times, proper medical care is not given in time. The Viperidae family differ much among themselves in their venom toxicity, such as the Indian Russell's viper can cause fatal results on lesser remedies speedily applied as they have b type of toxin, and the release of toxin is fairly significant as compared to other vipers. The bite of this viper may be extremely dangerous and can be followed by fatal results, especially in children and in the hotter parts of the continent. Most of the snakes are very dangerous, and all vipers are one of the few most beautiful reptiles due to their colour complexions and distinct dark patches. They are often confused with python, but they can be distinctly identified. 

FAQs on Russell's Viper

1. How Dangerous is Russell's Viper?

Ans- Russell's viper is one of the most dangerous and venomous snake species in the world. It is from the family of Viperidae, which is native to the Indian subcontinent. The venom of this species is delivered using solenoglyphous dentition, and the quality of this venom produced is quite fatal for humans. 


If Russell's viper bite is not treated immediately, then it may cause death within 3 hours. The kids may have multi-organ failure even faster than the adults.


The Russell's viper venom type varies for different species. It may be a neurotoxin or hemotoxin. If a neurotoxin is present, then the nervous system is attacked and further shuts down major organs one by one. If the venom is hemotoxic in nature, then it will cause blood coagulation or internal bleeding. As a result, the major vessels in the body may be clogged due to blood clots, or the major organs may shut down due to blood loss by internal bleeding. In any case, without anti-venom, death is a confirmed fate.

2. What Happens When Russell's Viper Bites?

Ans- The viper venom acts on the vascular system, which brings down the platelet counts and affects the blood by contributing towards the clotting in the pulmonary arteries. The action on the nervous system is not that great; the effect on respiration is not so direct. The influence on the circulation explains the venom's effect the most, which is the symptom of viperine envenomation. The pain is very severe around the wound, followed by discolouration and swelling of that affected area. The bite is followed by local pain, which is burning, and the limb soon swells up and becomes discoloured and within 1 to 3 hours, great prostration or cause, followed by vomiting and often diarrhoea.

3. Russell's Viper is Found in What Habitats?

Ans- Vipera russelli is mainly found in the southeast Asia regions, including India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Pakistan. In India, the most common place where this is found is in Punjab and Southern India, especially in Karnataka and in northern parts near the Bay of Bengal. These species are not restricted to a particular habitat but are seen to avoid dense forests. The snake is usually found in open grassy areas and found in scrub jungles of forests and plantations, and farmlands. It is most common in the plains coastal areas and hills, which have a suitable habitat. It is generally not found in higher altitudes and humid environments such as mass forms and rainforests. These are abundant in highly urbanized areas in settlements in the countryside as they are attracted by the rodents found in settlements.

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