Courses
Courses for Kids
Free study material
Offline Centres
More
Store Icon
Store

The quantity of heat needed to raise the temperature of ‘M’g of water from t=10C to t=20 C is $MC({t_2} - {t_1})$ .
(A) True
(B) false

seo-qna
Last updated date: 20th Jun 2024
Total views: 54.3k
Views today: 0.54k
Answer
VerifiedVerified
54.3k+ views
Hint: The calorie was originally defined as the amount of heat required at a pressure of 1 standard atmosphere to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1° Celsius. Since 1925 this calorie has been defined in terms of the joule, the definition since 1948 being that one calorie is equal to approximately 4.2 joules.

Solution step by step The specific heat is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 g of substance by one degree Celsius or one Kelvin.
The quantity of heat needed for M g of water from t=10C to t=20C is $MC({t_2} - {t_1})$ , where C is the specific heat capacity of the water.
So, the above statement is true

Additional information Molar heat capacity is a measure of the amount of heat necessary to raise the temperature of one mole of a pure substance by one degree K. Specific heat capacity is a measure of the amount of heat necessary to raise the temperature of one gram of a pure substance by one degree K.

Note: To calculate the energy required to raise the temperature of any given substance, here's what you require:
1. The mass of the material, m.
2. The temperature change that occurs, ΔT.
3. The specific heat capacity of the material, c (which you can look up). ...
4. Here is a source of values of c for different substances:
\[Q = m \times c \times \Delta T\]