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Difference Between Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet for JEE Main 2024

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Last updated date: 13th Jul 2024
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What is Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet: Introduction

To differentiate between electromagnet and permanent magnet: Electromagnets and permanent magnets are essential components in the field of physics. An electromagnet is formed by passing an electric current through a coiled wire, creating a magnetic field. Its strength can be adjusted by changing the current flow, making electromagnets versatile and. In contrast, a permanent magnet retains its magnetic field without relying on external sources. Made from materials such as iron or nickel, permanent magnets find everyday use in devices like speakers and compasses. Both electromagnets and permanent magnets contribute significantly to scientific exploration and technological advancements, providing invaluable insights into the phenomenon of magnetism and enabling a range of practical applications. Read further for more.


Category:

JEE Main Difference Between

Content-Type:

Text, Images, Videos and PDF

Exam:

JEE Main

Topic Name:

Difference Between Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet

Academic Session:

2024

Medium:

English Medium

Subject:

Mathematics

Available Material:

Chapter-wise Difference Between Topics


What is Electromagnet?

An electromagnet is a type of magnet created by passing an electric current through a coil of wire. The coil, also known as a solenoid, generates a magnetic field around it. The strength of the magnetic field can be controlled by adjusting the current flowing through the wire. This property makes electromagnets highly versatile and widely used in various applications. They are essential components in devices such as electric motors, generators, relays, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines. By harnessing the relationship between electricity and magnetism, electromagnets play a crucial role in both scientific research and practical technological advancements. The features of electromagnets are: 


  • Magnetic Field Control: One of the significant advantages of electromagnets is the ability to control the strength of the magnetic field they generate. By varying the amount of current passing through the coil, the magnetic field's intensity can be adjusted according to specific requirements.

  • On/Off Switching: Electromagnets can be easily turned on and off by controlling the flow of electric current. When the current is flowing, the electromagnet becomes magnetized, and when the current is stopped, the magnetic field disappears. 

  • Temporary Magnetism: Unlike permanent magnets, electromagnets exhibit temporary magnetism. The magnetic field is present only when an electric current is supplied to the coil. 

  • Adjustable Magnetic Polarity: By reversing the direction of the electric current in the coil, the polarity of the electromagnet can be changed. 

  • Strength and Scalability: Electromagnets can generate very strong magnetic fields, capable of exerting substantial forces. Additionally, the size and strength of an electromagnet can be easily adjusted by changing the number of wire turns in the coil or increasing the current, providing flexibility in design and application.


What is Permanent Magnet?

A permanent magnet is a material that possesses an inherent magnetic field without the need for any external source of power. It is typically made from materials like iron, nickel, or cobalt that have strong magnetic properties. Permanent magnets retain their magnetism over an extended period of time, hence the term "permanent." They have a fixed magnetic polarity, meaning they have a north and south pole that cannot be easily reversed or altered. Permanent magnets find widespread use in everyday applications such as speakers, electric motors, generators, hard drives, and compasses, where their constant and reliable magnetic field is essential for proper functioning. The features of permanent magnets are: 


  • Inherent Magnetic Field: Permanent magnets have an inherent magnetic field without the need for an external power source or current flow. They maintain their magnetism over an extended period of time.

  • Fixed Magnetic Polarity: Permanent magnets have a fixed magnetic polarity, with distinct north and south poles. The magnetic poles cannot be easily reversed or altered, providing a consistent and stable magnetic field.

  • Magnetic Strength: Permanent magnets can generate strong magnetic fields, and their strength is determined by the material composition and manufacturing process. They exhibit a magnetic force that can attract or repel other magnetic materials.

  • Persistence: Once magnetized, a permanent magnet retains its magnetic properties unless subjected to external influences such as heat or strong magnetic fields.

  • Durability: Permanent magnets are robust and durable, able to withstand physical stress, temperature variations, and environmental factors without losing their magnetic properties.


Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet Differences

S.No

Category 

Electromagnet 

Permanent Magnet

1.

Generation of Magnetism

Magnetism is generated by passing an electric current through a coil of wire

Inherent magnetism without the need for an external power source or current flow

2.

Magnetic Field Control

The strength of the magnetic field can be adjusted by varying the current flowing through the wire

The strength of the magnetic field is fixed based on the material composition

3.

On/Off Switching

Can be easily turned on and off by controlling the flow of electric current

Always in a magnetized state and cannot be turned off

4.

Temporary /

Permanent Magnetism

Exhibits temporary magnetism, where the magnetic field is present only when current flows

Retains magnetism over an extended period without the need for a continuous current

5. 

Magnetic Polarity

Polarity can be reversed by changing the direction of the electric current

Fixed magnetic polarity with distinct north and south poles

6. 

Strength Scalability

The size and strength can be adjusted by changing the number of wire turns or increasing the current

The magnetic strength is determined by the material composition and cannot be easily changed


These differences highlight the contrasting properties and applications of electromagnets, which rely on electric current to generate magnetism, and permanent magnets, which possess inherent magnetism.


Summary 

An electromagnet is a magnet created by passing an electric current through a coil of wire. It produces a magnetic field that can be controlled by adjusting the current flowing through the coil. Electromagnets require a continuous power source to maintain their magnetism. On the other hand, a permanent magnet is made from materials with inherent magnetic properties, such as iron, cobalt, or nickel. It retains its magnetism without the need for an external power source. The strength of a permanent magnet's magnetic field is fixed and cannot be easily changed.

FAQs on Difference Between Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet for JEE Main 2024

1. How does the strength of an electromagnet's magnetic field vary with current?

The strength of an electromagnet's magnetic field is directly proportional to the current flowing through the coil. Increasing the current increases the strength of the magnetic field, while decreasing the current weakens the magnetic field. This relationship follows Ampere's Law, which states that the magnetic field produced by an electric current is directly proportional to the current. By adjusting the current flowing through the coil, the strength of the electromagnet's magnetic field can be precisely controlled for different applications and requirements.

2. Do permanent magnets lose their magnetism over time?

Permanent magnets can retain their magnetism over a long period of time, but under certain conditions, they can gradually lose their magnetism. Factors such as exposure to high temperatures, strong magnetic fields in the opposite direction, and physical shock can affect the alignment of magnetic domains within the material, leading to a weakened or demagnetized state. However, in most normal conditions and everyday use, permanent magnets maintain their magnetism effectively and do not experience significant loss of magnetic properties.

3. What are some common applications of electromagnets?

Electromagnets are extensively used in electric motors, generators, relays, and solenoid valves. Electromagnets play a crucial role in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines, particle accelerators, and speakers. They are also utilized in industries such as transportation, robotics, and telecommunications for tasks like magnetic levitation trains, automated assembly lines, and communication systems. The ability to control and manipulate magnetic fields makes electromagnets essential in various technological advancements and scientific explorations.

4. Can the polarity of a permanent magnet be changed?

The polarity of a permanent magnet is typically fixed and cannot be easily changed. Permanent magnets are created with their north and south poles already established during the manufacturing process. While it is possible to alter the polarity of a permanent magnet through methods like heating it to its Curie temperature or subjecting it to a strong magnetic field in a specific orientation, these processes are not practical for regular use. Generally, the polarity of a permanent magnet remains constant, ensuring its reliable and consistent magnetic field orientation.

5. How are permanent magnets made?

Permanent magnets are typically made through a process called magnetization. The most common method involves exposing ferromagnetic materials, such as iron, nickel, or cobalt, to an intense magnetic field. This aligns the magnetic domains within the material, resulting in a magnetized state with a fixed north and south pole. The magnetization can be achieved through techniques like passing the material through a strong magnetic field or using electromagnets to generate the necessary magnetic flux. The material is then cooled or solidified in the magnetized state, creating a permanent magnet with its magnetic properties intact.