Courses
Courses for Kids
Free study material
Offline Centres
More
Store Icon
Store

Difference Between Multiplexer and Demultiplexer for JEE Main 2024

ffImage
Last updated date: 21st Jul 2024
Total views: 90.9k
Views today: 2.90k
hightlight icon
highlight icon
highlight icon
share icon
copy icon

What are Multiplexer and Demultiplexer - Introduction

Multiplexer and demultiplexer are fundamental components in digital systems and communication networks. They play a crucial role in controlling the flow of data between multiple sources and destinations. To ‘Explain multiplexer and demultiplexer’ ‘characteristics of multiplexer and demultiplexer  and ‘what is multiplexer and demultiplexer’ some information is given below.


Category:

JEE Main Difference Between

Content-Type:

Text, Images, Videos and PDF

Exam:

JEE Main

Topic Name:

Difference Between Multiplexer And Demultiplexer

Academic Session:

2024

Medium:

English Medium

Subject:

Physics

Available Material:

Chapter-wise Difference Between Topics


Defining Multiplexer (MUX):

A combinational circuit known as a multiplexer chooses one of many input lines and sends it to a single output line. It has a select input, several input lines, and a single output line. Which input line is connected to the output is determined by the choose input. N is the total number of select inputs, and 2N is the number of input lines in a multiplexer.


An explanation of a multiplexer's operation based on a truth table is possible. Consider a 4-to-1 multiplexer that has four data inputs (D0, D1, D2, and D3) along with two select inputs (S1 and S0). The selected inputs are used to determine the output (Y).


S1

S0

D0

D1

D2

D3

Y

0

0

0

1

0

0

D1

0

1

1

0

0

0

D2

1

0

0

0

1

0

D3

1

1

0

0

0

1

D4


In this example, based on the select inputs, the corresponding data input is passed to the output. The output can only have one of the input values at a time.


Defining Demultiplexer (DEMUX):

The opposite of a multiplexer is a demultiplexer. Based on the chosen inputs, it divides a single input line among a number of output lines. It features several select inputs, numerous output lines, and a single input line. N is the number of select inputs, and 2N is the number of output lines in a demultiplexer.


A truth table can also be used to describe how a demultiplexer works. Consider a 1-to-4 demultiplexer with four output lines (Y0, Y1, Y2, Y3) and two select inputs (S1 and S0). Based on the chosen inputs, the input (D) is distributed to one of the output lines.


S1

S0

D

Y0

Y1

Y2

Y3

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

0

1

1

1

0

0

0

1


In this example, based on the select inputs, the input data (D) is distributed to the corresponding output line. Only one output line can have the input value at a time.


Multiplexers and demultiplexers are often used together in data communication systems to combine multiple data streams into a single channel (multiplexer) and then split them back into individual streams at the receiving end.


Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Difference 

Sl. No.

Feature

Multiplexer

Demultiplexer

1

Purpose

Combines multiple input lines into a single output line

Distributes a single input line to multiple output lines

2

Number of Inputs

Multiple

Single

3

Number of Outputs

Single

Multiple

4

Select Inputs

Used to select the desired input line

Used to select the desired output line

5

Truth Table

Shows the relationship between inputs, select inputs, and output

Shows the relationship between input, select inputs, and outputs

6

Function

Performs data selection and routing

Performs data distribution and routing

7

Applications

Data multiplexing in communication systems

Data demultiplexing in communication systems

8

Example

4-to-1 multiplexer

1-to-4 demultiplexer


Both multiplexers and demultiplexers are critical components in digital systems, allowing efficient data transmission and distribution. They provide flexibility, cost-effectiveness, and increased utilization of resources by enabling the sharing of communication channels and optimizing data routing.


Summary

Here at the end we can derive the conclusion that- A multiplexer (MUX) is a digital logic circuit that combines multiple input signals into a single output signal. It allows the selection and transmission of data from one of several input lines to a common output line based on control inputs. Multiplexers are used in data communication, digital switches, memory addressing, and signal routing.


On the other hand, a demultiplexer (DEMUX) is the reverse of a multiplexer. It receives a single input signal and distributes it to one of several output lines based on control inputs. Demultiplexers are used to extract individual data streams from a shared channel or bus, enabling selective routing of data to different destinations.


Both multiplexers and demultiplexers are vital components in digital systems and communication networks. They facilitate efficient data transmission, resource sharing, and data distribution, thereby improving overall system performance.

FAQs on Difference Between Multiplexer and Demultiplexer for JEE Main 2024

1. What is Multiplexer? Give an example.

A multiplexer (MUX) is a digital logic circuit that combines multiple input signals into a single output signal. It selects one of the input lines based on control inputs and passes the selected input to the output. The number of input lines in a multiplexer is typically a power of 2.

2. What is a Demultiplexer? Give an example.

A demultiplexer (DEMUX) is a digital logic circuit that takes a single input signal and distributes it to one of several output lines based on control inputs. It is the reverse operation of a multiplexer. Demultiplexers are commonly used to extract individual data streams from a shared channel or bus.

3. What is the function of a multiplexer?

The key functions of a multiplexer are:


1. Data Selection: A multiplexer allows the selection of data from a set of input lines. It enables the transmission of data from one specific input line to the output line, based on the control inputs.


2. Signal Routing: Multiplexers are used for routing signals to different destinations. By choosing the appropriate input line through control inputs, a multiplexer directs the desired data signal to the output line or further processing.


3. Data Compression: In data communication systems, multiplexers are often used to combine multiple data streams into a single channel. This compression technique allows efficient utilization of communication resources and increases the overall data transmission capacity.

4. What is the function of a demultiplexer?

The key functions of a demultiplexer are:


1. Data Distribution: A demultiplexer allows the distribution of a single input signal to multiple output lines. It selects a specific output line based on the control inputs, and the input signal is transmitted only to the selected output line.


2. Signal Routing: Demultiplexers are used for routing a single signal to different destinations. By choosing the appropriate control inputs, a demultiplexer directs the input signal to the desired output line, enabling the distribution of data to specific destinations.


3. Data Demultiplexing: In communication systems, demultiplexers are used to extract individual data streams from a shared channel or bus. By applying the correct control inputs, a demultiplexer separates the multiplexed signal into its original individual signals, allowing each data stream to be processed or directed to its respective destination.

5. What are the types of multiplexer?

There are several types of multiplexers (MUX) based on their configuration and functionality. Here are some common types of multiplexers:


1. 2-to-1 Multiplexer: This is the simplest type of multiplexer, which has two input lines, one select input, and one output line. It selects and transmits one of the two input lines to the output based on the select input.


2. 4-to-1 Multiplexer: This type of multiplexer has four input lines, two select inputs, and one output line. It selects and transmits one of the four input lines to the output based on the select inputs.


3. 8-to-1 Multiplexer: An 8-to-1 multiplexer has eight input lines, three select inputs, and one output line. It selects and transmits one of the eight input lines to the output based on the select inputs.


4. n-to-1 Multiplexer: This refers to a multiplexer with n input lines and log₂(n) select inputs. It can handle a variable number of input lines depending on its configuration.


5. Priority Encoder: Although not a traditional multiplexer, a priority encoder can be considered a type of multiplexer. It has multiple input lines representing a priority order, and it encodes the highest priority active input into a binary output.


6. Multiplexer Array: Multiplexer arrays consist of multiple multiplexers interconnected to form a larger multiplexer with a higher number of inputs or complex routing capabilities.


These are just a few examples of multiplexer types. The selection of a specific type of multiplexer depends on the application requirements, such as the number of inputs, complexity of routing, and data selection needs.