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Difference Between Evaporation and Boiling for JEE Main 2025

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Last updated date: 13th Jul 2024
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What is Evaporation and Boiling: Introduction

To explain Evaporation and Boiling: When it comes to the transformation of a liquid into a gaseous state, two prominent processes come to the forefront: evaporation and boiling. Both evaporation and boiling involve the conversion of a liquid into vapour, but they differ in the manner and conditions under which this phase change occurs. Understanding the differences between evaporation and boiling is crucial for comprehending the underlying principles of phase change phenomena and their practical implications in various fields of science and everyday life.


Category:

JEE Main Difference Between

Content-Type:

Text, Images, Videos and PDF

Exam:

JEE Main

Topic Name:

Difference Between Evaporation and Boiling

Academic Session:

2025

Medium:

English Medium

Subject:

Physics

Available Material:

Chapter-wise Difference Between Topics


In this article, we embark on a journey to explore and elucidate the differences between evaporation and boiling, shedding light on their definitions, mechanisms, and key factors that govern their occurrence. By delving into these distinct yet interconnected phenomena, we can gain a deeper understanding of how liquids transition into a gaseous state and the implications of these processes in diverse contexts.


Evaporation is the process by which a liquid changes into a gas at temperatures below its boiling point. It occurs when individual molecules at the liquid's surface gain sufficient energy to overcome the attractive forces holding them in the liquid phase. These molecules escape into the surrounding space, forming a vapor. Evaporation can take place at any temperature, but it becomes more rapid as the temperature increases. Factors such as surface area, temperature, and the presence of air currents influence the rate of evaporation.


On the other hand, boiling is the rapid and vigorous phase change of a liquid into a vapour, typically occurring at or above the liquid's boiling point. Boiling involves the formation and rapid expansion of bubbles within the liquid caused by the conversion of the liquid into vapour throughout its bulk. The boiling point is the temperature at which the vapour pressure of the liquid equals the atmospheric pressure, allowing bubbles to form and rise to the surface. Unlike evaporation, which occurs only at the liquid's surface, boiling occurs throughout the entire liquid volume.


The differences between evaporation and boiling extend to the conditions under which they occur. Evaporation can happen at any temperature while boiling requires the liquid to reach its boiling point. Additionally, evaporation is a relatively slower and continuous process, whereas boiling is rapid and intense, characterized by the formation of bubbles and visible agitation within the liquid.


Understanding the differences between evaporation and boiling is essential in various fields, including thermodynamics, heat transfer, climate science, and everyday applications. From the natural process of water evaporation and its role in the water cycle to the controlled boiling of liquids in cooking and industrial processes, these phenomena shape our understanding of phase change and influence countless aspects of our lives.


Throughout this article, we will delve into the mechanisms, factors, and practical implications of evaporation and boiling. By unravelling the distinctions between these processes, we can deepen our knowledge of phase change phenomena and apply this understanding to areas such as energy transfer, climate modelling, food science, and beyond.


What is Evaporation and Boiling? 

Defining Evaporation

Evaporation is a process in which a liquid transforms into a gaseous state by gaining sufficient energy to overcome the intermolecular forces holding its molecules together. It occurs at temperatures below the boiling point of the liquid and predominantly takes place at the liquid's surface.


During evaporation, individual molecules near the surface of the liquid absorb energy from the surroundings, typically in the form of heat. As they gain kinetic energy, the molecules become more energetic and enter the vapour phase, escaping from the liquid's surface into the surrounding space. This transition occurs as the molecules break free from the attractive forces of the other liquid molecules.


The rate of evaporation is influenced by several factors. Temperature plays a significant role, as higher temperatures provide more energy for the molecules to overcome the attractive forces, leading to faster evaporation. The surface area of the liquid exposed to the surroundings also affects the rate of evaporation. A larger surface area allows more molecules to escape into the vapour phase simultaneously, increasing the overall evaporation rate.


Additionally, the presence of air currents or moving air can accelerate evaporation. When air moves over the liquid's surface, it carries away the vapour molecules, reducing the concentration of vapour near the liquid and creating a concentration gradient that facilitates further evaporation.


Evaporation is an essential natural process that plays a vital role in the water cycle. The sun's heat causes the evaporation of water bodies such as oceans, lakes, and rivers, transforming liquid water into water vapour in the atmosphere. This vapour eventually condenses to form clouds and returns to the Earth's surface as precipitation, completing the cycle.


In everyday life, evaporation has practical implications. Wet clothes are placed under the sundry due to the evaporation of water from their surfaces.


Defining Boiling

Boiling is a rapid and vigorous phase change process in which a liquid is heated to its boiling point, resulting in the rapid formation and expansion of bubbles within the liquid. It occurs when the vapour pressure of the liquid equals or exceeds the surrounding atmospheric pressure, allowing bubbles to form throughout the entire volume of the liquid.


When a liquid is heated, its molecules gain energy and move faster. As the temperature rises, the average kinetic energy of the molecules surpasses the attractive forces between them, leading to the formation of vapour bubbles. These bubbles consist of the vapour phase of the liquid and are initially small and dispersed within the liquid.


As the heat continues to be supplied, the vapour bubbles grow larger and rise to the liquid's surface due to buoyancy. Upon reaching the surface, the bubbles burst, releasing the vapour into the surrounding atmosphere. This bursting action creates visible agitation within the liquid, commonly known as boiling.


The boiling point of a liquid is the temperature at which its vapour pressure equals the atmospheric pressure. At this point, the liquid can undergo a phase change into a gas throughout its entire volume rather than just at the surface. The boiling point is unique to each substance and can be influenced by factors such as atmospheric pressure and the presence of solutes.


Boiling is an energetic process that requires a significant input of heat to sustain the rapid phase change. It is often accompanied by the release of steam, which consists of the gaseous form of the liquid. Boiling is commonly observed when heating water, causing it to rapidly convert into steam.


The intensity of boiling can be affected by various factors, including the heating rate, the properties of the liquid (such as its composition and purity), and the pressure surrounding the liquid. The high atmospheric pressure increases the boiling point, requiring a higher temperature to initiate boiling. Conversely, lowering the pressure, as in situations at high altitudes, reduces the boiling point and allows boiling to occur at lower temperatures.


Evaporation and Boiling Differences

Sl. No

Property

Evaporation

Boiling

1.

Process

Slow

Rapid

2.

Temperature

Occurs below the boiling point of the liquid

Occurs at or above the boiling point

3.

Bubbles

No visible bubbles formation

Visible bubbles formation


The above table describes some basic characteristics of evaporation and boiling.


Summary

By understanding the differences between evaporation and boiling, readers gain insights into the fundamental principles of phase change, heat transfer, and thermodynamics. The article explores the distinctive characteristics of each process, their energy requirements, and practical examples in various fields. From the controlled evaporation of liquids to the dynamics of boiling in cooking and industrial settings, a deeper understanding of these phenomena enables informed decision-making, energy optimization, and scientific advancements.

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FAQs on Difference Between Evaporation and Boiling for JEE Main 2025

1. What is evaporation?

Evaporation is the process by which a liquid transforms into a gas at temperatures below its boiling point.

2. How does boiling differ from evaporation?

Boiling is a rapid process that occurs at or above the boiling point of a liquid, while evaporation is a slower process that occurs below the boiling point.

3. What causes boiling to occur?

Boiling happens when the vapour pressure of a liquid equals or exceeds the atmospheric pressure, leading to the formation and expansion of bubbles throughout the liquid.

4. Does evaporation only happen at the liquid's surface?

Yes, evaporation predominantly occurs at the liquid's surface, where individual molecules gain sufficient energy to escape into the surrounding space.

5. What practical applications are associated with evaporation and boiling?

Evaporation is involved in processes such as drying wet clothes while boiling is utilized in cooking, industrial processes like distillation, and the production of steam for power generation.