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Difference Between Union and Intersection for JEE Main 2024

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Last updated date: 16th Jul 2024
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What is Union and Intersection: Introduction

To differentiate between union and intersection: The union and intersection of sets are fundamental operations used to combine or find common elements between sets. The union of two sets, denoted by the symbol (∪), creates a new set that contains all the distinct elements from both sets. It essentially merges the elements of both sets, excluding duplicates. On the other hand, the intersection of two sets, denoted by the symbol (∩), produces a new set that contains only the elements that are common to both sets. It identifies the shared elements between the sets. These operations play a crucial role in set theory, probability, and various branches of mathematics, allowing for the comparison, combination, and analysis of sets and their elements. Read further to understand them in detail. 


Category:

JEE Main Difference Between

Content-Type:

Text, Images, Videos and PDF

Exam:

JEE Main

Topic Name:

Difference Between Union and Intersection

Academic Session:

2024

Medium:

English Medium

Subject:

Mathematics

Available Material:

Chapter-wise Difference Between Topics


What is Union 

The union of sets refers to the operation of combining multiple sets to create a new set that contains all the distinct elements from the original sets. The union of two or more sets, denoted by the symbol (∪), results in a set that includes all the elements present in any of the sets, without duplication. For example, if set A = {1, 2, 3} and set B = {2, 3, 4}, their union (A ∪ B) would be {1, 2, 3, 4}. The union operation allows for the merging and consolidation of sets, facilitating comparisons, analysis, and broader set operations in mathematics and other disciplines. The features of the union are: 


  • Inclusion of Elements: The union of sets includes all the distinct elements present in any of the sets involved in the operation.

  • Elimination of Duplicates: When forming the union, duplicate elements are excluded, ensuring that each element appears only once in the resulting set.

  • Commutativity: The order in which sets are combined does not affect the result; the union operation is commutative. For example, A ∪ B = B ∪ A.

  • Associativity: The union operation is associative, meaning that when more than two sets are being united, the grouping of sets does not impact the outcome. For example, (A ∪ B) ∪ C = A ∪ (B ∪ C).

  • Idempotence: Repeatedly taking the union of a set with itself does not change the set. A ∪ A = A.

  • Universal Set Limitation: The union of a set with the universal set results in the universal set itself. A ∪ U = U.


What is Intersection

The intersection of sets refers to the operation of finding the common elements between two or more sets and creating a new set that contains only those shared elements. The intersection of sets, denoted by the symbol (∩), results in a set that includes all the elements present in all of the original sets. For example, if set A = {1, 2, 3} and set B = {2, 3, 4}, their intersection (A ∩ B) would be {2, 3}. The intersection operation allows for the identification and extraction of common elements among sets, aiding in set comparisons, analysis, and more advanced set operations in mathematics and other fields. The features of the intersection are: 


  • Shared Elements: The intersection of sets includes only the elements that are common to all of the sets involved in the operation.

  • Exclusion of Non-Common Elements: Elements that are present in one or some of the sets but not in all are excluded from the resulting set.

  • Commutativity: The order in which sets are intersected does not affect the result; the intersection operation is commutative. For example, A ∩ B = B ∩ A.

  • Associativity: The intersection operation is associative, meaning that when more than two sets are being intersected, the grouping of sets does not impact the outcome. For example, (A ∩ B) ∩ C = A ∩ (B ∩ C).

  • Idempotence: Repeatedly taking the intersection of a set with itself does not change the set. A ∩ A = A.

  • Empty Set Limitation: If there are no common elements among the sets, the intersection yields the empty set. A ∩ B = ∅.


Differentiate Between Union and Intersection 

S.No

Category 

Union 

Intersection

1

Definition

Combines elements from multiple sets

Includes only the elements common to all sets

2

Symbol

3

Universal Set Relationship

A ∪ U = U

A ∩ U = A

4

Identity Element

A ∪ ∅ = A

A ∩ U = A

5

Empty Set Limit

A ∪ ∅ = A

A ∩ ∅ = ∅

6

Resulting Set

Contains all distinct elements from the combined sets

Contains only the shared elements among the sets


This tabular representation highlights the critical difference between union and intersection of sets across various aspects, including their definitions, symbols, resulting sets, identity elements, empty set limits, and universal set relationships in different mathematical and logical contexts.


Summary 

The union and intersection of sets are fundamental operations used in mathematics and other disciplines to combine or find common elements between sets. The union of sets combines all the distinct elements from multiple sets, while the intersection identifies and extracts the elements that are common to all sets involved. The union operation includes the elements from any of the sets without duplication, while the intersection operation only includes the shared elements among the sets. Both operations are commutative and associative, meaning that the order and grouping of sets do not affect the result. The union of a set with the universal set results in the universal set itself, while the intersection of a set with the universal set yields the original set. Repeatedly taking the union or intersection of a set with itself does not change the set. If there are no common elements among the sets, the intersection yields the empty set. The tabular representation provided summarizes the key differences between union and intersection, including their definitions, symbols, resulting sets, identity elements, empty set limits, and universal set relationships.

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FAQs on Difference Between Union and Intersection for JEE Main 2024

1. Can the union of sets contain duplicate elements?

No, the union of sets does not contain duplicate elements. When performing the union operation on sets, the resulting set includes all the distinct elements from the combined sets, eliminating any duplicates. If there are duplicate elements present in the original sets, they will appear only once in the union set. The purpose of the union operation is to merge and combine sets, ensuring that each element is represented uniquely in the resulting set. 

2. What happens if the sets have no common elements in their intersection?

If the sets have no common elements in their intersection, the resulting intersection set will be an empty set (∅). The intersection of sets is the operation that identifies and includes only the elements that are common to all sets involved. If there are no elements that are shared among the sets, the intersection set will be empty. This occurs when there is no overlap or intersection between the sets. 

3. Can the union and intersection of sets be combined in a single operation?

Yes, the union and intersection of sets can be combined in a single operation known as the intersection-union operation, denoted as ∪∩. This operation involves finding the union of two sets and then taking the intersection of the resulting set with another set. For example, if we have sets A, B, and C, the intersection-union operation can be expressed as (A ∪ B) ∩ C. It first combines the elements of A and B, creating a new set, and then identifies the common elements between the resulting set and C. 

4. How is the intersection of sets represented using symbols? 

The intersection of sets is represented using the symbol "∩". When performing the intersection operation, the symbol is placed between the sets being intersected. For example, if we have two sets A and B, their intersection is denoted as A ∩ B. The symbol signifies the operation of finding the common elements between the sets. It visually represents the point at which the sets overlap or intersect. 

5. Can the union of sets result in an empty set?

No, the union of sets cannot result in an empty set unless all the sets involved in the union operation are empty sets themselves. The union of sets combines all the distinct elements from the sets being united. If at least one set contains elements, the resulting union set will also contain those elements. However, if all the sets being united are empty, meaning they have no elements, then the union operation will yield an empty set. Therefore, the union of non-empty sets will never result in an empty set.