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Difference Between Cell and Battery for JEE Main 2024

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Last updated date: 25th Jul 2024
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What are Cell and Battery: Introduction

To explain cell and battery:Electricity is a fundamental aspect of our lives, powering a vast array of devices and systems. In the realm of physics, understanding the concepts of electrical energy and its storage is crucial. Two terms often used interchangeably in everyday language are "cell" and "battery." However, in the study of physics, these terms have distinct meanings. While they share some similarities, there are key difference between cell and battery.Understanding characteristics of cell and battery is a big part of physics, and it's especially important for students studying for tests like NEET and JEE. In this article, we'll look at some of the most important ways in which the characteristics of cell and battery are the same and different.


Category:

JEE Main Difference Between

Content-Type:

Text, Images, Videos and PDF

Exam:

JEE Main

Topic Name:

Difference Between Cell and Battery

Academic Session:

2024

Medium:

English Medium

Subject:

Mathematics

Available Material:

Chapter-wise Difference Between Topics


Defining Cell:

  • A cell, in the context of physics, refers to an electrochemical cell, which is a device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy. It consists of two electrodes—a positive electrode called the cathode and a negative electrode known as the anode—immersed in an electrolyte solution. The electrodes are made of different materials that undergo specific chemical reactions.

  • The anode, the negative terminal, is where oxidation occurs, releasing electrons into the external circuit. The cathode, the positive terminal, undergoes reduction, attracting the released electrons. The electrolyte solution facilitates the movement of ions between the electrodes, maintaining charge balance.

  • When a cell is connected to an external circuit, the electrons flow from the anode to the cathode, generating an electric current. This flow of electrons is driven by the chemical reactions taking place within the cell. The electrical energy produced by the cell can be utilized to power various devices.

  • Cells come in various types, such as primary cells and secondary cells. Primary cells are non-rechargeable, meaning once their chemical reactions are depleted, they cannot be restored to their original state. Examples of primary cells include alkaline batteries and zinc-carbon batteries.

  • Secondary cells, on the other hand, are rechargeable. They can be repeatedly recharged by applying an external electrical current that reverses the chemical reactions within the cell. Common examples of secondary cells are lead-acid batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, and lithium-ion batteries.


Defining Battery:

  • A battery, in the realm of physics, is a collection of cells connected in series or parallel to provide a higher voltage or longer-lasting power supply. It is essentially a combination of individual cells. By connecting multiple cells together, the voltage and capacity of the battery can be modified to suit specific requirements.

  • When cells are connected in series, the positive terminal of one cell is connected to the negative terminal of the next cell, resulting in an additive increase in voltage. For instance, if two cells each produce 1.5 volts are connected in series, the total voltage across the battery becomes 3 volts.

  • In contrast, connecting cells in parallel involves connecting the positive terminals of all cells together and the negative terminals together. This configuration keeps the voltage the same while increasing the overall capacity or runtime. For example, if two cells with a capacity of 1000 milliampere-hours (mAh) each are connected in parallel, the total capacity of the battery becomes 2000 mAh.

  • Batteries are widely used to power a diverse range of devices and systems. From small everyday gadgets like flashlights and remote controls to larger-scale applications like electric vehicles and renewable energy storage systems, batteries provide a portable and reliable source of electrical energy.


Cell and Battery Difference

S.No

Category

P Type Semiconductor

N Type Semiconductor

1

Definition

A single device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy.

A collection of cells connected together to provide a higher voltage or longer-lasting power supply.

2

Number of Cells

Only one cell.

Two or more cells connected in series or parallel.

3

Voltage

Typically lower voltage (e.g., 1.5V for alkaline cells).

Higher voltage due to the combined voltages of multiple cells.

4

Capacity/Runtime

Lower capacity or runtime as it is a single unit.

Higher capacity or runtime depending on the number of cells and their configuration.

5

Rechargeability

Primary cells are non-rechargeable. Secondary cells are rechargeable.

Can be rechargeable or non-rechargeable depending on the type of cells used.

6

Chemical Reactions

Chemical reactions occur within a single cell.

Chemical reactions occur within individual cells and collectively within the battery.

7

Application

Suitable for low-power devices such as calculators, watches, and small electronics.

Used in various applications ranging from small gadgets to larger-scale systems like laptops, electric vehicles, and renewable energy storage.

8

Size and Portability

Cells are often small, portable, and self-contained.

The size and portability depend on the number and type of cells used. Batteries can vary in size from small, handheld ones to larger, bulkier units.

9

Examples

Alkaline cell, zinc-carbon cell, lithium-ion cell.

Alkaline battery, lead-acid battery, nickel-cadmium battery, lithium-ion battery.


So from the above definition and table, we understand what is cell and battery , cell and battery difference and different characteristics of cell and battery.


Summary

A cell is a single device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy, while a battery is a collection of cells connected together to provide a higher voltage or longer-lasting power supply. Cells are typically used in low-power devices and are smaller and more portable. On the other hand, batteries find applications in a wide range of devices and systems, with their voltage and capacity depending on the number and configuration of cells used. Understanding these differences is essential in the study of physics and the practical application of electrical energy.

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FAQs on Difference Between Cell and Battery for JEE Main 2024

1. Can a cell and a battery be recharged?

Primary cells, which are commonly used in single-use batteries like alkaline batteries, are non-rechargeable. On the other hand, secondary cells, used in rechargeable batteries like lithium-ion batteries, can be repeatedly recharged by applying an external electrical current that reverses the chemical reactions within the cell.

2. Explain cell and battery in terms of size and portability.

Cells are generally small, compact, and highly portable. They are designed to fit seamlessly into devices and are commonly used to power small electronics and portable gadgets. Their compact size allows for easy integration and transportation. Batteries, on the other hand, can vary in size and portability. While smaller batteries maintain a reasonable level of portability, larger batteries used in applications like electric vehicles or power storage systems can be larger and heavier. These batteries are designed for specific compartments or dedicated areas rather than direct portability. The size and portability of a battery depend on factors such as the number and type of cells used, as well as the intended application.

3. What is the significance of connecting cells in series or parallel in a battery?

Connecting cells in series increases the overall voltage of the battery. In contrast, connecting cells in parallel keeps the voltage the same but increases the overall capacity or runtime. These configurations allow for customization of the battery's electrical characteristics to meet specific application requirements.

4. Explain cell and battery in brief.

To explain cell and battery in brief, First we have to know what is cell and battery.A cell is a single device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy. It consists of electrodes immersed in an electrolyte solution. A battery, on the other hand, is a collection of cells connected together to provide a higher voltage or longer-lasting power supply. By combining multiple cells, batteries can meet the power requirements of various devices and systems. Cells are often used in small electronic devices, while batteries find applications in a wide range of devices, from portable electronics to electric vehicles and renewable energy storage.

5. Concisely describe the cell and battery difference along with their voltage.

A cell is a single unit that converts chemical energy into electrical energy. It consists of two electrodes—an anode and a cathode—submerged in an electrolyte solution. When connected in a circuit, chemical reactions occur, creating a potential difference or voltage across the electrodes. Different types of cells have varying voltages, with common examples being alkaline cells with a voltage of 1.5 volts and lithium-ion cells with a voltage of 3.7 volts.


A battery, on the other hand, is a combination of cells connected together. By connecting cells in series or parallel, the voltages add up, resulting in a higher overall voltage. For example, a battery made up of four alkaline cells connected in series would have a total voltage of 6 volts (1.5 volts per cell multiplied by four cells).