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Difference Between Molecular and Hybrid Orbitals for JEE Main 2024

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Last updated date: 23rd May 2024
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What is Molecular and Hybrid Orbitals: Introduction

To differentiate between molecular and hybrid orbitals: Molecular and hybrid orbitals are concepts used in chemistry to describe the arrangement of electrons in molecules. Molecular orbitals result from the overlap and mixing of atomic orbitals on different atoms, forming new orbitals that extend over the entire molecule. They define the probability distribution of finding electrons within the molecule. On the other hand, hybrid orbitals are a combination of atomic orbitals of different types, resulting from the hybridization of atomic orbitals. They provide a more accurate representation of the bonding and geometry in molecules and are used to explain molecular properties and reactivity. Let’s understand them further in depth.


Category:

JEE Main Difference Between

Content-Type:

Text, Images, Videos and PDF

Exam:

JEE Main

Topic Name:

Difference Between Molecular and Hybrid Orbitals

Academic Session:

2024

Medium:

English Medium

Subject:

Chemistry

Available Material:

Chapter-wise Difference Between Topics


What is Molecular Orbitals?

Molecular orbitals are regions of space where electrons are most likely to be found in a molecule. They are formed by the overlapping and mixing of atomic orbitals from different atoms. The combination of atomic orbitals results in the formation of bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals, which determine the stability and reactivity of the molecule. The distribution of electrons in these orbitals determines the chemical and physical properties of the molecule. The molecular orbital theory provides a framework for understanding and predicting molecular structure, bonding, and spectroscopic behavior. The characteristics of molecular orbitals are:


  • Overlap: Molecular orbitals are formed through the overlap of atomic orbitals from different atoms. The degree of overlap determines the strength and stability of the resulting molecular orbital.

  • Energy levels: Molecular orbitals have different energy levels, and electrons occupy these orbitals based on the Aufbau principle and the Pauli exclusion principle.

  • Bonding and antibonding nature: Molecular orbitals can be either bonding or antibonding in nature. Bonding molecular orbitals have lower energy and contribute to the stability of the molecule, while antibonding orbitals have higher energy and weaken the bonding.

  • Electron density: Molecular orbitals describe the probability density of finding electrons within the molecule. The shape and distribution of the electron density influence the chemical and physical properties of the molecule.

  • Mixing of atomic orbitals: Molecular orbitals result from the mixing and combination of atomic orbitals from different atoms, leading to the formation of new orbitals that extend over the entire molecule.

  • Molecular orbital diagrams: These diagrams illustrate the energy levels and occupancy of molecular orbitals in a molecule, providing insights into bonding, electron configuration, and overall stability.


What is Hybrid Orbitals?

Hybrid orbitals are a combination of atomic orbitals from the same atom. They are formed through a process called hybridization, where the atomic orbitals mix to create new hybrid orbitals that have different shapes and orientations. Hybrid orbitals are used to explain the molecular geometry and bonding in molecules. They provide a more accurate representation of the electron distribution and allow for the prediction of molecular properties and reactivity. Hybrid orbitals are named based on their geometry, such as sp, sp2, and sp3, corresponding to linear, trigonal planar, and tetrahedral geometries, respectively. The characteristics of hybrid orbitals are: 


  • Combination of atomic orbitals: Hybrid orbitals are formed through the mixing or hybridization of atomic orbitals from the same atom. This process creates new hybrid orbitals with different shapes, orientations, and energies.

  • Geometry: Hybrid orbitals determine the molecular geometry or spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule. The type of hybridization (e.g., sp, sp2, sp3) corresponds to specific geometries, such as linear, trigonal planar, and tetrahedral, respectively.

  • Bonding properties: Hybrid orbitals participate in bonding by overlapping with orbitals from other atoms, leading to the formation of sigma bonds. The number and type of hybrid orbitals determine the number and nature of bonds formed.

  • Electron density: Hybrid orbitals describe the probability density of finding electrons within the molecule. The shape and distribution of the electron density influence the chemical and physical properties of the molecule.

  • Energy levels: Hybrid orbitals have different energy levels, and electrons occupy these orbitals based on the Aufbau principle and the Pauli exclusion principle.

  • Compatibility with molecular orbitals: Hybrid orbitals can interact and overlap with molecular orbitals from other atoms, facilitating the formation of molecular bonds and determining the overall electronic structure of the molecule.


Differentiate Between Molecular and Hybrid Orbitals

S.No

Category 

Molecular Orbitals

Hybrid Orbitals

1.

Formation

Result from the overlap and mixing of atomic orbitals

Formed through hybridization of atomic orbitals

2.

Source of Orbitals

Atomic orbitals from different atoms

Atomic orbitals from the same atom

3.

Geometry

No specific geometry, distributed over the entire molecule

Determine the molecular geometry based on the hybridization

4.

Bonding

Participate in bonding by overlapping with other atomic orbitals

Participate in bonding and determine the type and number of bonds formed

5. 

Energy Levels

Have varying energy levels depending on the type of molecular orbital

Have different energy levels depending on the type of hybrid orbital

6. 

Examples

Bonding and antibonding orbitals, sigma and pi orbitals

sp, sp2, sp3 orbitals


This table highlights some general difference between molecular and hybrid orbitals in terms of geometry, energy levels, formation, examples, etc.


Summary

Molecular orbitals are formed by the combination of atomic orbitals from multiple atoms. They describe the distribution of electrons in a molecule, representing the probability of finding an electron in a particular region. Whereas, hybrid orbitals are formed by mixing atomic orbitals of different types, such as s, p, or d orbitals, within an atom. This hybridization process occurs to optimize bonding in molecules. Hybrid orbitals have specific shapes and energies, allowing for the formation of strong covalent bonds.

FAQs on Difference Between Molecular and Hybrid Orbitals for JEE Main 2024

1. Can molecular orbitals extend over the entire molecule?

Yes, molecular orbitals can extend over the entire molecule. When atomic orbitals combine and overlap, they form molecular orbitals that span the entire molecule. These molecular orbitals distribute the electron density across the entire molecular structure. This allows for the delocalization of electrons, providing stability to the molecule and influencing its chemical and physical properties. The distribution of electrons in molecular orbitals determines the bonding, reactivity, and overall behavior of the molecule as a whole.

2. How do hybrid orbitals determine the geometry of a molecule?

Hybrid orbitals determine the geometry of a molecule through their spatial arrangement. The type of hybridization (such as sp, sp2, or sp3) corresponds to a specific molecular geometry. For example, sp hybridization leads to linear geometry, sp2 hybridization leads to trigonal planar geometry, and sp3 hybridization leads to tetrahedral geometry. The hybrid orbitals align themselves in a way that minimizes electron-electron repulsion and maximizes bonding. The resulting geometry influences bond angles and overall molecular shape, playing a crucial role in determining the molecule's properties and reactivity.

3. How are molecular orbitals labeled or classified?

Molecular orbitals are labeled or classified based on their energy levels and symmetries. The molecular orbitals are often assigned labels such as σ (sigma), π (pi), δ (delta), etc., based on the type of bonding involved. Additionally, molecular orbitals are labeled according to their relative energies, such as bonding (lower energy) and antibonding (higher energy) orbitals.

4. Can hybrid orbitals have different energy levels?

Yes, hybrid orbitals can have different energy levels. The energy level of a hybrid orbital depends on the types and energies of the atomic orbitals involved in the hybridization process. Different types of hybrid orbitals, such as sp, sp2, and sp3 orbitals, have varying energy levels. The specific hybridization scheme and the nature of the atoms involved influence the resulting energy levels of the hybrid orbitals. These energy differences contribute to the stability and reactivity of molecules and play a role in determining their overall electronic structure and bonding behavior.

5. Can hybrid orbitals be involved in pi bonding?

Yes, hybrid orbitals can be involved in pi bonding. While hybrid orbitals are primarily associated with sigma bonding, they can also contribute to pi bonding in certain cases. For example, in molecules with double or triple bonds, the unhybridized p orbitals can overlap sideways to form pi bonds. The hybrid orbitals can still provide sigma bonding, while the unhybridized p orbitals contribute to pi bonding.