Courses
Courses for Kids
Free study material
Offline Centres
More
Store Icon
Store

Difference Between Fat Soluble and Water Soluble Vitamins for JEE Main 2024

ffImage
Last updated date: 23rd May 2024
Total views: 73.5k
Views today: 1.73k
hightlight icon
highlight icon
highlight icon
share icon
copy icon

Explain Fat Soluble and Water Soluble Vitamins: Introduction

Vitamins are essential organic compounds required by the body in small amounts for various physiological functions. They play crucial roles in metabolism, growth, and overall health. Vitamins are broadly classified into two categories: fat-soluble and water-soluble. Understanding the differences between these two types of vitamins is important to recognize their unique properties and the ways in which they are absorbed, transported, and stored in the body. In this article, we will explore the dissimilarities between fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins.


Category:

JEE Main Difference Between

Content-Type:

Text, Images, Videos and PDF

Exam:

JEE Main

Topic Name:

Difference Between Fat Soluble and Water Soluble Vitamins

Academic Session:

2024

Medium:

English Medium

Subject:

Chemistry

Available Material:

Chapter-wise Difference Between Topics


What is Fat Soluble Vitamins?

Fat-soluble vitamins are those that take up fats from the food we eat.

The essential fat-soluble vitamins are A, D, E, and K. Each can be easily found in a variety of meals and serves a different and significant purpose. Every fat-soluble vitamin has a significant function. The list below briefly mentions a few of them.

Our bodies can hold onto fat-soluble vitamins for up to six months.


Vitamin A:

  • Our immune system is strengthened by vitamin A.

  • Positively affects vision

  • Helps reproductive processes

  • supports our organs and encourages cell growth

  • Dairy products, certain seafood, carrots, broccoli, etc. are sources of vitamin A.


Vitamin D:

  • Together with calcium, vitamin D helps to strengthen our bones.

  • Helps our muscles move more easily

  • Supports the immune system Vitamin D sources - Vitamin D is not a natural component of the majority of foods. Instead, direct sunshine exposure causes our bodies to manufacture vitamin D.


Vitamin E:

  • Our immune system is supported by vitamin E.

  • Keeps blood clots at bay

  • Being an antioxidant, it aids our body's defence against substances that cause cancer.

  • Vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, and leafy greens are sources of vitamin E.


Vitamin K:

  • Aids in blood coagulation thanks to vitamin K

  • By preventing conditions like osteoporosis, which causes the bones to deteriorate and become brittle, it promotes the health of our bones.

  • Leafy greens (spinach, kale, etc.), vegetable oils, blueberries, meat, dairy, etc. are sources of vitamin K.

  • Our bodies can hold onto fat-soluble vitamins for up to 6 months.


What is Water Soluble Vitamins:

  • The excess of water-soluble vitamins is excreted through the urine, so they are not stored in our bodies. As a result, these vitamins require constant replenishment.

  • B and C vitamins are water-soluble nutrients.

  • Vitamins that are soluble in water are referred to as water-soluble vitamins.

  • Vitamin C and the group of B vitamins are two significant water-soluble vitamins.

  • As briefly described below, each of these vitamins performs a vital purpose in our body.


Vitamin C: 

  • It functions as an antioxidant to guard our body's cells from any harm.

  • It produces collagen, a potent protein that aids in wound healing, and it aids in the body's absorption of iron from the fruits and vegetables we ingest.

  • It also strengthens our immune system, which keeps us healthy.

  • Citrus fruits, bell peppers, broccoli, strawberries, tomatoes, and other foods are sources of vitamin C.


Vitamin B:

  • It provides our body with energy so that it can run.

  • Red blood cell production is aided by it.

  • Whole grains, seafood, chicken, dairy, legumes, and other foods are sources of vitamin B.

  • Water-soluble vitamins must be supplied frequently because they are not stored by our bodies and have a short shelf life.


Characteristics of Fat Soluble and Water Soluble Vitamins:

Based on their solubility, vitamins are divided into two types:


Vitamins that are fat-soluble: 

(i) These are kept in the body's muscles, liver, and fatty tissue.

(ii) Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble nutrients.

(iii) readily absorbed by the body when there is fat present.

Vitamins that are water-soluble: 

(i) The body does not store them.

(ii) Vitamins C and B are water soluble.

(iii) The body eliminates any extra amounts of these vitamins through urine.


Fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins difference:


S.No

Category 

Fat soluble vitamins

Water soluble vitamins

1.

Meaning

Vitamins that can dissolve in fat are called fat-soluble vitamins

Vitamins that can dissolve in water are called water-soluble vitamins

2.

Example

Vitamin A, D, E, K

Vitamin B, C

3.

Site of Absorption

Small intestine

Small intestine

4.

Affinity to Water

Hydrophobic

Hydrophilic

5.

How Body Handles Excess

Extra is kept in the fatty tissues of the body

The kidney excretes extra vitamins

6.

Transportation

For many vitamins to pass through the blood, carriers (proteins) are needed

Travel freely in the bloodstream

7.

Toxicity

More toxicity

Low toxicity

8.

Deficiency

Symptoms emerge rather rapidly

It takes time for symptoms to appear


While some similarities exist between the two, it's important to note that the site of absorption of Fat soluble and water-soluble vitamins difference. These differences highlight the varying number of Affinity to Water, how the body handles excess, and the transportation of fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins. These characteristics play a significant role in determining the meaning, toxicity and properties of vitamins.


Summary

Understanding the differences between fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins is important for maintaining a balanced and nutritious diet. Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body and require dietary fats for absorption, while water-soluble vitamins are readily absorbed and excreted through urine. Adequate intake of both types of vitamins is necessary for overall health and well-being. By incorporating a variety of foods from different sources, individuals can ensure they receive a proper balance of fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins to meet their nutritional needs.

Popular Vedantu Learning Centres Near You
centre-image
Mithanpura, Muzaffarpur
location-imgVedantu Learning Centre, 2nd Floor, Ugra Tara Complex, Club Rd, opposite Grand Mall, Mahammadpur Kazi, Mithanpura, Muzaffarpur, Bihar 842002
Visit Centre
centre-image
Anna Nagar, Chennai
location-imgVedantu Learning Centre, Plot No. Y - 217, Plot No 4617, 2nd Ave, Y Block, Anna Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600040
Visit Centre
centre-image
Velachery, Chennai
location-imgVedantu Learning Centre, 3rd Floor, ASV Crown Plaza, No.391, Velachery - Tambaram Main Rd, Velachery, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600042
Visit Centre
centre-image
Tambaram, Chennai
location-imgShree Gugans School CBSE, 54/5, School road, Selaiyur, Tambaram, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600073
Visit Centre
centre-image
Avadi, Chennai
location-imgVedantu Learning Centre, Ayyappa Enterprises - No: 308 / A CTH Road Avadi, Chennai - 600054
Visit Centre
centre-image
Deeksha Vidyanagar, Bangalore
location-imgSri Venkateshwara Pre-University College, NH 7, Vidyanagar, Bengaluru International Airport Road, Bengaluru, Karnataka 562157
Visit Centre
View More
Competitive Exams after 12th Science

FAQs on Difference Between Fat Soluble and Water Soluble Vitamins for JEE Main 2024

1. What does fat-soluble vitamin mean?

The fat cells in the body contain vitamins called fat-soluble vitamins, which need fat to be absorbed. There are four fat-soluble vitamins: A, D, E, and K.

2. What results from a deficiency in water-soluble vitamins?

The brain, nerves, and heart may be impacted by a lack of water-soluble vitamins due to the depletion of ATP.

3. What occurs when there is a vitamin E deficiency?

Vitamin E deficiency can harm muscles and nerves, impairing the body's ability to move and causing loss of feeling in the arms and legs. Additionally, it results in eye issues and muscle weakness.

4. What happens if too much vitamin A is consumed?

A hazardous dose of vitamin A can cause headaches, exhaustion, nausea, and dizziness. In extreme circumstances, it might even lead to coma and death.

5. Which vitamins are soluble in water? Explain them in detail.

Vitamin C and the group of B vitamins are two significant water-soluble vitamins.

Vitamin C:

  1. It functions as an antioxidant to guard our body's cells from any harm.

  2. It produces collagen, a potent protein that aids in wound healing, and it aids in the body's absorption of iron from the fruits and vegetables we ingest.

  3. It also strengthens our immune system, which keeps us healthy.

Citrus fruits, bell peppers, broccoli, strawberries, tomatoes, and other foods are sources of vitamin C.

Vitamin B:

  1. It provides our body with energy so that it can run.

  2. Red blood cell production is aided by it.

Whole grains, seafood, chicken, dairy, legumes, and other foods are sources of vitamin B.