Preparation of Colloidal Solution - Gum

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What is a Colloidal Solution?

A colloidal solution is a heterogeneous solution that contains particles of intermediate size. For example, milk. The particles cannot be normally seen with a naked eye. However, light reflected by them can be seen under an ultramicroscope. The particles of a colloidal solution can pass through ordinary filter paper but not through the animal membrane. In this article, we have covered the steps to prepare colloidal solution of gum.

In a colloid chemistry experiment, the colloid (solution gum) is formed as a product. In a solution gum, the dispersed phase may consist of particles of a single macromolecule or an aggregate of many atoms, molecules or ions.

Solution gum is a type of colloidal sol. Colloidal sol has an extensive surface area per unit mass. These types of solutions are intermediate between true solutions and suspension. 


The Classification of Colloids Depending on the Nature of the Interaction Present Between the Dispersed Phase and the Dispersion Medium.

The classification of colloids is contingent on the nature of interconnection between the dispersed phase and dispersion medium, the colloidal sols can be categorised into two types:

  1. Lyophilic sols

  2. Lyophobic sols


Lyophilic Sol

These are the type of colloidal sols in which the particles or molecules of the dispersed phase have a high affinity towards the dispersion medium. Therefore,  known as lyophilic colloids. These types of colloidal solutions can be easily formed. The lyophilic colloids are reversible (return to their original free components state) in nature. The reversible nature of sols is an important characteristic of lyophilic sols. This indicates that when the dispersion medium is extracted from the dispersed phase, the solutions can be again formed by simply remixing it with the dispersion medium. These solutions are quite stable. Therefore, it does not undergo the coagulation process. In case water acts as the dispersion medium, the lyophilic colloid.

The common examples of lyophilic colloids are solution gum, gelatin, starch, and rubber.


Lyophobic Sol

These are the type of colloidal sols in which there is no or very little affinity between the particles of the dispersed phase and the dispersion medium. Therefore, these types of sols are called lyophobic colloids or sols. 


Steps to Prepare Colloidal Solution of Gum 

Solution gum is a lyophilic sol in which water is the dispersed phase. A colloid chemistry experiment is a branch of chemistry that deals with the formation of colloidal sols. For the preparation of a lyophilic solution of gum, a gum is heated with water at a temperature of around 100 degrees celsius. For this preparation process, we require a funnel, burner, glass rod, gloves, tripod stand, beaker, wire gauze, filter paper, gum, pestle and mortar, and distilled water.


Step by Step Preparation:

  1. Take 500 mg of gum in the pestle and mortar and make a fine paste of it by adding a few drops of distilled water.

  2. Add 100 ml of distilled water to a beaker and heat it to 100 degrees Celsius temperature.

  3. Now, slowly add the fine gum paste into the above-distilled water boiling beaker with the help of a glass rod.

  4. Keep stirring the above boiling mixture constantly.

  5. Boil the water and gum mixture for ten minutes.

  6. After boiling, remove the mixture from the burner and leave it for cooling.

  7. After complete cooling, filter the mixture with the help of filter paper and funnel.

  8. The filtrate formed above is the colloidal sol of gum. 

While performing this reaction you need to keep some precautions

These Precautions are:

  1. Properly wash the apparatus before performing your experiment. After washing, rinse your apparatus with the distilled water.

  2. Do not use tap water for the preparation of the colloidal solution of the gum.

  3. Do not mix the fine paste of gum into boiling water at once. You need to add it slowly into the boiling water. Then only the gum sol will be formed.

  4. Grind the gum finely so that a fine paste of gum can be prepared.

  5. Work carefully while heating the distilled water on the burner.


Did you know?

  • The colloidal component that is present in the small portion is known as the dispersed phase. 

  • The formation of lyophilic colloid sol is reversible in nature. While the formation of lyophobic colloidal sol is irreversible in nature.

  • Lyophilic colloidal sol does not show Tyndall effect.

  • In a colloid chemistry experiment, the lyophilic colloidal solution can be easily formed by direct mixing. While the lyophobic colloidal sol formed by the special method.

  • Lyophilic sol does not carry any charge on it.

FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

Question: What is the Colloidal Solution?

Answer: A colloidal solution is a heterogeneous solution that contains particles of intermediate size. For example, milk. The particles cannot be normally seen with a naked eye. However, the light reflected by the colloidal sols is easily visible under an ultramicroscope.

Question: What are the Different Types of Colloidal Sol?

Answer: The different types of colloidal sols are:

  • Lyophilic Sols

In this type of colloidal solutions, the particles of the dispersed phase have a great affinity or attraction towards the dispersion medium. Due to the high attraction towards the dispersion medium, these solutions are called lyophilic sols or colloids. These solutions can be easily formed by mixing and are reversible in nature. 

  • Lyophobic Sols 

In this type of colloidal solutions, there is no attraction between the particles of the dispersed phase and the dispersion medium. Therefore, these sols are called lyophobic colloids.