Siamese Fighting Fish

What is Siamese Fighting Fish?

The Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) is a freshwater tropical fish in the family Osphronemidae (order Perciformes) that is known for its males' ferocity toward one another. The Siamese fighting fish was domesticated in Thailand for use in competitions. Fin nipping is the most common form of combat, which is accompanied by a display of extended gill covers, spread fins, and intensified colouring. The name of betta fish in english is Siamese Flighter fish.


The elongated and slender fish grows to about 6.5 centimetres in length (2.5 inches). It is predominantly greenish or brown in the wild, with moderately sized red fins however, it has been bred with long flowing fins and a variety of colours, including red, green, blue, and lavender, under domestication.

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Betta Splendens

The betta splendens, also known as the Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), is a freshwater fish native to Southeast Asia, specifically Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam. While there are 73 species in the genus Betta, only Betta splendens is commonly referred to as a "betta," owing to its worldwide popularity as a pet they are among the most widely available aquarium in the world, thanks to their varied and vibrant colour, diverse morphology, and relatively low maintenance. Siamese fighting fish are endemic to Thailand's central plain and have been domesticated for at least 1,000 years, making them one of the biggest fish on the planet.


They were originally bred for aggression and applied to cockfighting-style gambling matches. Theodore Cantor, a Danish physician, zoologist, and botanist, is reported to have given some Betta to King Rama III (1788-1851), who is supposed to have given some to Theodore Cantor, a Danish physician, zoologist, and botanist. They first appeared in the West in the late 1800s and became popular as ornamental fish within a few decades. They've earned the name "designer fish of the aquatic world" thanks to their long history of selective breeding, which has resulted in a wide range of colouring and finnage.


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Betta splendens are notoriously territorial, with males prone to attacking each other if housed in the same tank without a means of escape, one or both fish will usually die.


In confined spaces, female bettas can become territorial towards one another. Betta splendens can withstand low oxygen levels and poor water quality thanks to their special labyrinth organ, which is unique to the Anabantoidei suborder and allows for surface air intake.


The Siamese fighting fish is the national aquatic animal of Thailand, which continues to be the leading breeder and exporter of betta fish for the global aquarium market.


Despite their popularity as pets, the IUCN has classified B. splendens as "vulnerable" due to increased pollution and habitat destruction.


What is a Betta Fish?

Betta fish are among the most popular and attractive pet fish in the world, but they weren't always that way. The genus Betta contains over 73 species, but the most well-known is Betta splendens, also known as the Siamese Fighting Fish. Betta fish in the wild is a dull greyish-green colour with short fins, unlike the vibrantly coloured, long-finned beauties of today! Veil, delta, Halfmoon, crowntail, double tail, and a variety of other colours and fin types have been developed through selective breeding.


Betta Fish Origin and Distribution

Bettas are native to Thailand (previously known as Siam, thus its name), Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, and areas of China's shallow waters.


Rice paddies, ponds, slow-moving streams, and swamps, all of which are home to bettas, may be found in these regions. Bettas have now been introduced to a variety of sites, resulting in the emergence of non-native populations in several nations.


Because of the tradition of planned bouts between males, similar to cockfights, the popular term Siamese fighting fish was coined. These matches are still going on today, thanks to the money made through betting. Males are developed expressly for hostility in particular areas to ensure better battles.


Colours and Markings

Females are generally less colourful and have shorter fins than males. This species is rarely vividly coloured in nature. The most popular and beautiful pet is the betta fish in the world, but that wasn't always so. The genus Betta contains more than 73 recognized species, but the fish most people are familiar with is Betta splendens, or Siamese Fighting Fish. The male betta is one of the most well-known aquarium fish due to its vivid colours and long flowing fins.

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Colours such as white, yellow, orange, red, pink, blue, green, turquoise, brown, and black have been produced as a consequence of captive breeding initiatives. From plain hues to those with varying fin and body colours, to patterned hues, a wide range of combinations may be seen. Due to selective breeding, fin types have also altered. Crown tails, deltas, fans, half moons, lyre, and split tails, to mention a few, have all joined Veil tails.


Both sexes have a torpedo-shaped body with an upturned mouth designed for surface feeding. Females are somewhat smaller than males when they reach adulthood, measuring two to three inches in length. The existence of a labyrinth organ in this species allows them to collect oxygen from the atmosphere rather than from the water, helping them to survive in low-oxygen pools.


About Fighter Fish Tankmates

Males cannot be maintained together in a tank unless separators are present.

Multiple females can usually be maintained together without issue, and a single male can be thrown in for good measure. They may be maintained with other calm fish as long as they're tiny and don't bite at the fins, like tiger barbs.

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Diet and Feeding

Bettas eat insects and insect larvae nearly entirely in the wild. They have an upturned mouth, which is ideal for capturing any poor bug that falls into the water. Internally, they have a considerably shorter alimentary tract than vegetarian fish, indicating that their digestive system is suited for meat. As a result, live foods are the best diet for bettas, although they will adapt to flake foods and frozen or freeze-dried meals as well.

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Brine shrimp, Daphnia, plankton, tubifex, glass worms, and beef heart are also great frozen or freeze-dried alternatives. If flake food is being fed, it should be supplemented with frozen and freeze-dried items, as well as live animals if possible. Flake food should be supplemented with frozen and freeze-dried meals, as well as live meals if feasible.


Gender Differences

Males have more vibrant colours and long, flowing fins than females.

They also have a greater overall size and a more distinct "beard" (behind the gill covers) than females. When females are ready to mate, they have short fins with vertical stripes and an egg spot.

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Breeding the Betta

Bettas have a short lifespan and are most successful as breeders when they are less than a year old; bettas in pet stores are typically at least six months old.


They breed in bubble nests and don't need a big tank or any special equipment to do so. A bare-bottomed tank of about ten gallons works well for most breeders, though smaller tanks can also be used. Before breeding, the fish should be conditioned by being fed a diet of live foods. The pH of the water in the breeder tank should be around 7.0, and the temperature should be around 80 or slightly higher.

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When the male is ready to spawn, he will create an elaborate bubble nest.

Because males can become aggressive during courtship, the female should be provided with a hiding place. Even with a hiding spot, the female is likely to lose a few scales or have her fins frayed during the spawning process.


The pair will display intense colouration and begin circling each other under the bubble nest when they are ready to spawn. The male will wrap his arms around the female who has turned her back on him. The eggs are fertilised and begin to sink as she expels them. The eggs will be sucked up by the male and spit into the nest. The male will now be in charge of the brood. The female should be removed because the male may become aggressive towards her while tending to his young.


The male will continue looking just after the bubble nest, spitting eggs back into it. The eggs will hatch in one to two days, and the fry will be visible in the bubble nest with their tails pointing downward. They'll continue to eat from their yolk sack for another 36 hours, during which time the male will pick up any fry that falls out of the nest.


Betta Fish Facts and Information

Betta fish are native to Asia, where they live in marshes, ponds, and slow-moving streams in shallow water. Bettas, when housed with other fish, may establish a territory centred around a plant or rocky alcove, becoming very territorial of it and hostile toward intruding rivals; as a result, bettas require at least 45 litres of water (about 10 gallons). Bettas, contrary to common opinion, get along with a wide variety of aquarium fish. Bettas will only attack smaller and slower fish than themselves, such as guppies, if the conditions are right.

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Male bettas have devoted fathers who use their mouths to create bubble nests for their young and fiercely protect them from predators. Betta fish, like us, are diurnal. That means they work during the day and sleep at night, requiring the use of darkness to get a good night's sleep.


While some bettas are caught in the wild, the large bulk of those sold in the United States come from breeding farms in Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries, where keeping them in small bottles is common.


Fish are haphazardly dumped into baskets covered with nets and scooped up into small plastic cups when it's time to pack them for transport to the United States.


Conclusion

Siamese fighting fish are endemic to Thailand's central plain and have been domesticated for at least 1,000 years, making them one of the biggest fish on the planet. They were originally bred for aggression and applied to cockfighting-style gambling matches. They first appeared in the West in the late 1800s and became popular as ornamental fish within a few decades. They've earned the name "designer fish of the aquatic world" thanks to their long history of selective breeding, which has resulted in a wide range of colouring and finnage. The Siamese fighting fish is the national aquatic animal of Thailand.


Betta fish native to Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, and areas of China's shallow waters. Both sexes have a torpedo-shaped body with an upturned mouth designed for surface feeding. The male betta is one of the most well-known aquarium fish due to its vivid colours and long flowing fins. Colours such as white, yellow, orange, red, pink, blue, green, turquoise, brown, and black have been produced as a consequence of captive breeding initiatives. They eat insects and insect larvae nearly entirely in the wild.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

Q.1) Can a Betta Fish Live in a Fishbowl?

Answer: Yes, a betta fish can survive and flourish in a fishbowl if you replace the water frequently. However, a bowl is far too tiny for any tropical fish, even betta, so for greater fish safety and health, consider a filtered and heated 2.5-gallon aquarium.

Q.2) Can Betta Fish Fight With Other Aquatic Animals?

Answer: Betta fish are naturally territorial, and when they come into contact with other males in the wild, they will nearly always react aggressively.


Less dominant bettas have lots of places to run and hide in their natural habitats of Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam's canals and rice paddies, so fighting isn't always necessary.


A battle between two powerful bettas, on the other hand, maybe vicious and enjoyable to some in the 19th century. Betta fighting became such a popular sport in certain locations that people began breeding the fish to make them more aggressive. Bettas are thought to have this genetic aggression today.

Q.3) What Fish Can Be Kept With Siamese Fighters?

Answer: 


Compatible Fish

Catfish, danios, corydoras, angelfish, and tetras are some of the aquarium fish that Siamese fighting fish flourish with the most. You could discover success if they all reside together in a tank with plenty of plants. Avoid keeping Siamese fighting fish with barbs or characins in your aquarium.

Q.4) What Do You Need to Keep a Siamese Fighting Fish?

Answer: Here are few essential things to make sure your Siamese fighting fish has the best life possible:

  1. Space Bettas require at least 15 litres of water to suit their behavioural and psychological demands, but 20 litres or more is optimal.

  2. Filtering and oxygen.

  3. Heating.

  4. Cleanliness.

  5. Proper food.

  6. Environmental enrichment.

  7. Tankmates.