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Difference Between Stomata and Lenticels

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Last updated date: 17th Apr 2024
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How Lenticels are Different from Typical Stomata?

Imagine walking through a vibrant garden or exploring a lush forest, surrounded by a diverse array of plant life. As you observe these plants, you may notice intriguing structures on their surfaces that contribute to their survival and well-being. Two such structures are stomata and lenticels, which play crucial roles in the gas exchange process of plants.


Understanding the distinctions between stomata and lenticels is vital to unravelling the intricacies of how plants interact with their environment. In this article, we will explore the definition, interesting facts, characteristics, and how Lenticels are different from typical Stomata.

Stomata and Lenticels: Nature's Breath of Life

Stomata are microscopic openings typically found on the surfaces of leaves, although they can also be present on stems and other plant organs. Each stoma consists of two specialised cells, known as guard cells, that surround a pore. These guard cells can open and close the pore to regulate the passage of gases, such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour, in and out of the plant.


Lenticels, on the other hand, are raised, porous structures found on the surface of stems, branches, and woody tissues of certain plants. They appear as small, corky bumps or lines. Lenticels consist of loosely arranged cells with air spaces between them, allowing for gas exchange between the inner tissues of the plant and the outside environment.


Let's understand more about it by going through their facts and how they are important. In this way, I will be able to explain stomata and lenticels in more detail.


Interesting Facts about Stomata and Lenticels: 

Stomata are plant pores for gas exchange, with uneven distribution and night-time opening. Lenticels allow gas exchange, come in varied shapes, and aid in ethylene diffusion. Let's learn some interesting facts about Stomata and Lenticels


Stomata:

Quantity and Distribution: Stomata are not evenly distributed on the surfaces of leaves. They are more abundant on the lower surface compared to the upper surface. This distribution helps to minimise water loss by reducing exposure to direct sunlight and wind, especially in hot and dry conditions.


Aquatic Adaptations: While stomata are commonly found on the lower surface of leaves, some aquatic plants have stomata on the upper surface. This adaptation allows them to efficiently exchange gases even when submerged in water.


Night-time Function: Stomata are typically open during the day for gas exchange and photosynthesis. However, in some plants, such as CAM (Crassulacean Acid Metabolism) plants, stomata remain closed during the day to conserve water and open at night for carbon dioxide uptake


Lenticels: 

Varied Appearance: Lenticels exhibit a wide range of shapes, sizes, and distribution patterns. Some lenticels appear as small, raised corky bumps, while others may form elongated lines or irregular patches on the surface of stems and woody tissues.


Colourful Lenticels: In certain tree species, lenticels can display unique colours, adding visual interest to the bark. For example, the white speckles seen on the trunks of birch trees are lenticels, and their distinctive colouration enhances the aesthetic appeal of these trees.


Role in Ethylene Diffusion: Lenticels not only facilitate gas exchange but also play a role in the diffusion of ethylene, a plant hormone involved in various physiological processes, including fruit ripening and leaf senescence. Lenticels provide an avenue for ethylene to escape from tissues, enabling the regulation of these important developmental processes.


These facts guide us towards understanding the Stomata and Lenticels difference.


Difference Between Stomata and Lenticels 

S.No

Category

    Stomata

    Lenticels

1.

Location

Typically found on the surface of leaves

Found on stems, branches, and woody tissues

2.

Structure

Consist of two guard cells and a pore

Composed of loosely arranged cells with air spaces

3.

Function

Facilitate gas exchange for photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration

Enable gas exchange between the inner tissues of the plant and the external environment

4.

Gas Exchange

Involved in the exchange of gases such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour.

Assist in the exchange of gases, including oxygen and carbon dioxide

5.

Regulation

Guard cells can open and close the pore to regulate gas exchange.

Lenticels cannot open or close like stomata.

Gas exchange through lenticels occurs passively through diffusion.

6.

Water Balance

Stomata play a role in regulating transpiration and controlling water loss.

Lenticels do not play a direct role in regulating water balance.


Characteristics of Stomata and Lenticels:

Stomata have unevenly distributed pores on plant surfaces, opening during the day for gas exchange. Lenticles are varied structures facilitating gas exchange and ethylene diffusion, exhibiting diverse shapes and sizes.


Stomata:

  • Found on the surface of leaves, but can also occur on stems and other plant organs.

  • Consist of two guard cells that regulate the opening and closing of the pore.

  • Mainly involved in the exchange of gases, including oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour.

  • Essential for photosynthesis and respiration in plants.

  • Help to control the water balance of the plant by regulating transpiration.


Lenticels 

  • Primarily found on the surface of stems, branches, and woody tissues.

  • Composed of loosely arranged cells with air spaces in between.

  • Enable gas exchange between the inner tissues of the plant and the external environment.

  • Aid in the exchange of gases like oxygen and carbon dioxide.

  • Assist in the diffusion of ethylene, a plant hormone involved in ripening and senescence.


Summary 

Stomata and lenticels are both vital structures that facilitate gas exchange in plants. Stomata are small pores primarily located on the surface of leaves, while lenticels are specialised pores found on the surface of stems and woody tissues. Stomata are involved in regulating transpiration and are more abundant on the lower surface of leaves, while lenticels play a role in gas exchange within the woody parts of the plant. Understanding the characteristics and functions of stomata and lenticels helps us appreciate the remarkable adaptations of plants to their environment. In this way, we were able to understand Stomata and Lenticels' differences and how useful they are.

FAQs on Difference Between Stomata and Lenticels

1. Can plants survive without stomata?

No, plants cannot survive without stomata. Stomata are crucial for the exchange of gases necessary for plant growth and survival. During photosynthesis, stomata allow plants to take in carbon dioxide, a key component for producing carbohydrates and oxygen. Additionally, stomata enable the release of oxygen produced during photosynthesis and water vapour through transpiration. This process helps maintain proper hydration and temperature regulation within the plant. Without stomata, plants would be unable to obtain the necessary carbon dioxide for photosynthesis or release excess oxygen and water vapour, leading to impaired growth and potential death.

2. Are lenticels present in all plants?

Lenticels are primarily found in woody plants and certain species with specialised tissues. They are most commonly observed in trees, shrubs, and some herbaceous plants that possess woody stems or branches. However, not all plants have lenticels. Non-woody plants, such as most herbaceous annuals and perennials, usually do not develop lenticels. Lenticels are more prevalent in species with thicker, corky bark or in areas where gas exchange is particularly crucial, such as on branches or stems that are partially or fully submerged in water.

3. How do stomata and lenticels differ in their function?

Stomata primarily regulate gas exchange in leaves and are involved in multiple processes crucial for plant survival. They facilitate the intake of carbon dioxide required for photosynthesis and the release of oxygen and the water vapour generated during this process. Stomata also play a role in regulating water loss through transpiration, a process that helps cool the plant and maintain hydration. Lenticels, on the other hand, serve as openings in the bark or woody tissues of plants. They enable gas exchange between the internal tissues of the plant and the external environment. Lenticels are involved in the diffusion of gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, as well as the movement of ethylene, a plant hormone important for ripening and senescence processes. Unlike stomata, lenticels cannot open or close, and gas exchange through lenticels occurs passively through diffusion.