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There are a number of different geographical features found on Earth. Be it an island or be it a mountain region. The Earth is full of beautiful places to visit and wonder upon. Among these, lagoons are also beautiful places that we usually see in the coastal regions. These are generally small water body which comes in existence when being alienated by the main body of water. In this article, we will only be discussing these water bodies. We will cover the whole lagoon geography along with lagoon definition geography and its various features or types etc. This article will surely help you to understand one of the important and beautiful features of the Earth.


Lagoon Meaning

This word has been derived from the Italian term " Laguna " which means pond or lake. These are small inland water bodies that are separated by some barrier from the main water body. These small water bodies can be of different types such as coastal, atoll, river mouth, and artificial.

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Lagoon Definition Geography

According to the Cambridge dictionary, " lagoon means an area of seawater separated from the sea by a reef ie. a line of rocks and sand."

According to the Oxford learner's dictionary, lagoon means, "a lake of salt water that is separated from the ocean by a reef or an area of rock or sand" Or "a small area of freshwater near a lake or river" Or "an artificial area built to hold wastewater before it is treated at a sewage treatment plant".


How are they Formed?

They are formed because of some barriers that separate them from the ocean. Their formation depends upon various factors such as sediment sources, waves, tides, storms, barriers bars, tsunamis, hurricanes, etc. When sand or sediments etc. continue to move and creates a bar and block the mouth of the bay which results in the separation of a small water body from its main body, then it is termed as a lagoon.


Types of Lagoons

It can be classified into the following categories:


Coastal Lagoons

  • These are the most common type of lagoon that find in the coastal regions.

  • These are the water bodies that are formed in the areas of small tides ranges. 

  • They do not form in the areas of tides of more than than 4 meters or steep and rocky coastal areas.

  • They have a short life because they are exposed to the shores.

  • They have brackish water.

  • They are a productive ecosystem that is dominated by saltwater because of having a connection with the oceans.

  • These lagoons are shallow inland water bodies that act as a transitional zone between the land and the water.

  • After the formation of lagoons, they are being modified through erosional and depositional activities.

  • They can be further divided into various categories on the basis of their average salinity, tidal regime, and geomorphic types.

  • For example, Lagoon of Venice in the Mediterranean Sea, and Curonian Lagoon in the Baltic sea.

Atoll Lagoons

  • These are formed by the separation of coral reefs.

  • The coral reefs divide a small water body from the main body of water.

  • They form usually in areas that are suitable for coral reefs as well.

  • These reefs act as a barrier here rather than any sand or land which are called atolls.

  • These atoll formations may take a very long time such as 300,000 years.

  • These types of lagoons can be seen in the South Pacific or the Indian Ocean.

River Mouth Lagoons

  • They form at the mouths of the coastal rivers.

  • These can also be considered coastal lagoons.

  • They have brackish water which means partly fresh water and partly saltwater.

  • These can be seen most commonly in Newzealand and South Pacific islands.

Artificial Lagoons

  • These are man-made and not natural.

  • These are increasing and becoming popular.

  • These can be used for recreation or residential or other purposes.

  • They are more controlled and safe as they can be made anywhere with suitable conditions and requirements.

  • The only freshwater can also be found here rather than brackish water.

Did You Know?

Blue Lagoon of Iceland is one of the most famous lagoons of the world and it is man-made. The rich mineral content present here gives it a blue appearance.


Conclusion

Thus, in this article, we have covered one of the geographical features of the Earth i.e. Lagoons. We have seen the natural and beautiful features of the Earth. We have learned what is a lagoon, how is it formed, various types of lagoons, etc. This article will help you to increase your knowledge and will help you in learning Geography as well. You can check more interesting and Informative articles on our website. We feel that these articles will help you to learn more about our planet and its Geography.

We have learned about lagoon Geography. Let's practice some FAQs related to this concept of Geography: 

FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

Question 1. What is a Lagoon? How is it Formed?

Answer. These are small inland water bodies that are separated by some barrier from the main water body. The formation depends upon various factors such as sediment sources, waves, tides, storms, barriers bars, tsunamis, hurricanes, etc. When sand or sediments etc. continue to move and creates a bar and block the mouth of the bay which results in the separation of a small water body from its main body, then it is termed as a lagoon. They can be formed because of coral reefs and also can be artificially made by humans as per the requirements at any location.

Question 2. What Do You Mean by Coastal Lagoons?

Answer. These are the most common type of lagoon that find in the coastal regions. These are the water bodies that are formed in the areas of small tides ranges. and do not form in the areas of tides of more than than 4 meters or steep and rocky coastal areas. They have a short life because they are exposed to the shores and have brackish water. They are a productive ecosystem that is dominated by saltwater because of having a connection with the oceans. These lagoons are shallow inland water bodies that act as a transitional zone between the land and the water. They can be further divided into various categories on the basis of other geographical features. For example, Lagoon of Venice in the Mediterranean Sea.