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Reaction Between Sodium ThioSulphate and Potassium Iodide

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What is Sodium Thiosulphate?

Sodium Thiosulphate is an inorganic compound sodium thiosulfate (sodium thiosulphate) has the formula $${{Na}_{2}{S}_{2}{O}_{3}{.}{x}{H}_{2}{O}}$$. It is usually available as a white or colourless pentahydrate, $${{Na}_{2}{S}_{2}{O}_{3}{.}{5}{H}_{2}{O}}$$. The various names for sodium thiosulphate are sodium hyposulfite, hyposulphite of soda. Sodium Thiosulphate is also used to treat cyanide poisoning, pityriasis versicolor, and to reduce cisplatin side effects. It is frequently used after the cyanide poisoning medication sodium nitrite and is usually only recommended in severe cases. It is administered either intravenously or topically.


What is Potassium Iodide?

Potassium iodide is a chemical compound that also serves as a medication and dietary supplement. It is used as a medication to treat hyperthyroidism, in radiation emergencies, and to protect the thyroid gland from certain types of radiopharmaceuticals.It is also used for the treatment of cutaneous sporotrichosis and phycomycosis in developing nations. It is used as a supplement in people with weak iodine intakes.


Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, rash, and salivary gland swelling. Allergic reactions, headache, goitre, and depression are some of the other side effects. While use during pregnancy may be harmful to the baby, it is still advised in radiation emergencies. KI is the chemical formula for Potassium Iodide. It is commercially produced by combining potassium hydroxide and iodine.


Since at least 1820, potassium iodide has been used in medicine. It is included on the list of essential medicines. Potassium iodide is available as a generic and over-the-counter medication. Potassium iodide is also used in salt iodization.


Aim of the Experiment

The rate of reaction between sodium thiosulphate and potassium iodide is studied in this experiment.


Theory of the Experiment

Indirectly, the reaction between Potassium Iodide and Sodium Thiosulphate includes the formation of iodide ions that are oxidised in an acidic medium. The overall reaction happens in two stages.

$${{Cu}{S}{O}_{4}{+}{4}{K}{I}}$$ $$\to$$ $${{Cu}_{2}{I}_{2}{+}{2}{K}_{2}{S}{O}_{4}{+}{I}_{2}}$$

$${{I}_{2}{+}{2}{Na}_{2}{S}_{2}{O}_{3}}$$ $$\to$$ $${{2}{Na}{I}{+}{Na}_{2}{S}_{4}{O}_{6}}$$

With a starch solution, the evolved iodine produces a blue colour. This is also known as a clock reaction.


Materials Required

The materials required for this experiment are given below:

  • Six conical flask of volume 250 mL

  • Stop-watch

  • Trough

  • Measuring cylinder of volume 100 mL

  • 2 M Sulphuric acid

  • 5% Starch solution

  • 6% Potassium Iodide solution

  • 0.04M Sodium thiosulphate solution

  • 6% Sodium Thiosulphate solution


Procedure of the Experiment

  1. Mark a 250 mL conical flask with the letter ‘P’.

  2. Fill the container with 25 mL of 6% Potassium Iodide solution, 50 mL of distilled water, and 25 mL of 2.0 M H2SO4.

  3. Shake the contents of the flask vigorously.

  4. Maintain the flask in a temperature bath.

  5. Take five conical flasks, each with a capacity of 250 mL. Label them with the letters Q, R, S, T, and U.

  6. Fill flasks Q, R, S, and T with 6% Na2SO3 solution, starch solution, and distilled water in the proportions listed below, and keep flask U to carry out the reaction.

  7. Pour 20 mL of Na2SO3 solution, 75 mL of distilled water, and 5 mL of starch solution into the conical flask labelled 'Q.' Place the flask in the water bath after thoroughly mixing the contents.

  8. Fill the 'R' conical flask with 15 mL of Na2SO3 solution, 80 mL of distilled water, and 5 mL of starch solution. Place the flask in a water bath and stir the mixture.

  9. Add 10 mL of Na2SO3 solution, 85 mL of distilled water, and 5 mL of starch solution to conical flask 'S.' Place flask S in a water bath after mixing the contents.

  10. 5 mL Na2SO3 solution, 90 mL distilled water, and 5 mL starch solution in conical flask 'T' Keep the contents of flask T stirred and in the water bath.

  11. Take the 'U'-shaped conical flask. Pour 25 mL of the solution from conical flask 'P' and 25 mL of the solution from conical flask Q into the conical flask. When half of the solution from flask Q has been added, start the stopwatch. Maintain the flask in the water bath while thoroughly mixing. Time taken for it to appear in blue colour. Time taken for it to appear in blue colour.

  12. Repeat the experiment with the solutions in flasks R, S, and T, using 25 mL of the solution as in the experiment with flask Q, and record the time required to achieve blue colour.

  13. Record your observations as given in a table.

  14. Examine the tabulated data and determine the relationship between the time the blue colour appears and the variation in Na2SO3 concentration.


Important Questions

1.Is sodium thiosulfate an oxidising agent?

Ans. Thiosulfate ion $${{(}{S}_{2}{O}_{3}^{2-}{)}}$$is a moderately strong reducing agent used in an indirect procedure to determine oxidising agents in which iodine is an intermediate agent. In solutions containing high levels of iodine, starch decomposes irreversibly. As a result, it is clear that sodium thiosulfate is a critical chemical compound in human life. Register with Vedantu and download the mobile application on your smartphone to learn more about this compound and its reaction with hydrochloric acid.


2.What is the use of sodium thiosulphate in laboratories?

Ans. Sodium thiosulphate is a critical compound in both chemical and pharmaceutical laboratories. Because of its medicinal properties, it is a common reagent in pharmaceutical labs. Because it reacts in equimolar amounts with elemental iodine, it is also used in chemistry labs for iodine titration. In the titration, it actually acts as a reducing agent. It is used as a reducing agent in many other chemistry lab reactions. It's also used to dechlorinate water by lowering its toxicity. When it reacts with chlorine, it produces harmless chlorides that are removed from the water.


Multiple Choice Questions

1. In titration of iodine with sodium thiosulfate, the equivalent weight of sodium thiosulphate is ( Mol Wt 248)

(a) 248

(b) 124

(c) 62

(d) 24.8

Answer: (b)


2. How many grams of sodium thiosulphate should be taken to prepare 100 ml of 0.1 N solution

(a) 8 gm

(b) 1.24 gm

(c) 2.48 gm

(d) 12.4 gm

Answer: (b)


Conclusion

  • Sodium Thiosulphate, also known as thiosulfuric acid or disodium salt, is an inorganic salt that comes in pentahydrate form.

  • The various names for sodium thiosulphate are sodium hyposulfite, hyposulphite of soda.

  • Sodium Thiosulphate is also used to treat cyanide poisoning, pityriasis versicolor, and to reduce cisplatin side effects.

  • Potassium iodide is a chemical compound that also serves as a medication and dietary supplement. It is used as a medication to treat hyperthyroidism, in radiation emergencies, and to protect the thyroid gland from certain types of radiopharmaceuticals.

Last updated date: 27th Sep 2023
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FAQs on Reaction Between Sodium ThioSulphate and Potassium Iodide

1. What are the future prospects of usage of Sodium thiosulphate?

Sodium thiosulphate is a vital compound, and researchers will continue to investigate its many potential applications. Ongoing research on the medicinal chemistry of this compound indicates that arthritis patients who used to take this compound as medicine have a much lower chance of developing Alzheimer disease in the long run. It has shown potential to be one of the best medicines for neurodegenerative treatment in the long run, and research on this is currently underway as a neuroprotective agent, and it may be widely used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease in the near future.

2. How safe is it to use Sodium thiosulphate as medicine?

Sodium thiosulfate has a wide range of applications in medicine, but it can also be toxic and cause side effects when used incorrectly. The following are some of the most common side effects of the medication:

  • Nausea and vomiting are common side effects of sodium thiosulphate treatment for kidney disease calciphylaxis.

  • Because sodium thiosulphate is a hygroscopic compound with a tendency to attract water, it cannot be used in certain kidney, heart, and liver disease patients because retaining water can worsen the situation.

  • It frequently causes dizziness and headaches.

  • Dermatitis and local skin irritations are common side effects.

  • This medication frequently causes blood pressure to drop and, at times, become dangerously low.

3. Why is sodium thiosulphate not a primary standard substance?

A primary standard is a substance that can be weighed and made into an exact known concentration solution. The solution can then be used to conduct a titration to determine. Another solution's concentration. As a result, it must be available in a consistently pure state. It should not contain water of crystallisation because this casts doubt on its absolute concentration. It may absorb or release undetermined amounts of this water. Sodium thiosulfate contains crystallisation water. As a result, sodium thiosulphate is not regarded as a primary standard.