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A pair of rails on a railway track is an example of.....
$\left( a \right)$ Intersecting lines
$\left( b \right)$ Non – intersecting lines
$\left( c \right)$ Parallel lines
$\left( d \right)$ None of these

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Hint: In this particular question use the concept that on railway tracks trains are running and they need a pair of rails to run, so if these pairs of rails intersect then how the train will run so these pairs of rails will never intersect so use these concepts to reach the solution of the question.

Complete step by step answer:
The pictorial representation of the pair of rails is given below:

Parallel lines:
Two lines are said to be parallel if they never intersect each other and these lines are always at a specific distance i.e. the distance between these lines are always constant throughout.
For example: a pair of rails on a railway track, lines draw from the opposite sides of a scale, etc.
Intersecting lines:
Two or more lines are said to be intersecting lines if they intersect at least one point.
For example: chair, triangle, etc.
Non – intersecting lines:
Two or more lines are said to be non-intersecting if they never intersect each other but it is not necessary they are parallel.
For example: In three dimensional geometry, skew lines are two lines that do not intersect and are not parallel.
As we know that trains' widths are always constant so the pair of rails on the railway tracks always have a specific width throughout, that’s why a pair of railway tracks are always parallel to each other.
So a pair of rails on a railway track is an example of parallel lines.
So this is the required answer.

So, the correct answer is “Option C”.

Note: Whenever we face such types of questions the key concept we have to remember is that parallel lines never intersect each other, intersecting lines intersect at a particular point and non-intersecting lines never intersects each other but it is not necessary that they are parallel to each other.
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