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Important Questions for CBSE Class 10 Science Chapter 6 - Life Processes 2024-25

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Last updated date: 30th May 2024
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CBSE Class 10 Science Chapter-6 Important Questions with Answers - Free PDF Download

Class 10 examination is the most crucial and significant exam in a student’s life. The marks secured in Class 10th Board exams are an essential attribute that decides their future study course. It is during this year in school that a student chooses his/her career. Losing marks is not an option for a student in 10th Board exams. Science is one of the most important subjects of Class 10 CBSE exam. In this subject, the students learn about various activities that occur in our surroundings. It also teaches the students about human beings, plants and animals. Science can be pretty tough for the students to understand. A brief comprehension of the chapters and important questions and answers can help you get a complete knowledge of the subject. Vedantu brings you the Important Questions for Class 10 Science Chapter 6, which are compressed in a PDF format. The students can refer to these questions during the preparation of exams. Vedantu is a platform that provides free CBSE Solutions (NCERT) and other study materials for students. Maths Students who are looking for the better solutions, they can download Class 10 Maths NCERT Solutions to help you to revise complete syllabus and score more marks in your examinations.


Download CBSE Class 10 Science Important Questions 2024-25 PDF

Also, check CBSE Class 10 Science Important Questions for other chapters:

CBSE Class 10 Science Important Questions

Sl.No

Chapter No

Chapter Name

1

Chapter 1

Chemical Reactions and Equations

2

Chapter 2

Acids, Bases and Salts

3

Chapter 3

Metals and Non-metals

4

Chapter 4

Carbon and Its Compounds

5

Chapter 5

Periodic Classification of Elements

6

Chapter 6

Life Processes

7

Chapter 7

Control and Coordination

8

Chapter 8

How do Organisms Reproduce?

9

Chapter 9

Heredity and Evolution

10

Chapter 10

Light Reflection and Refraction

11

Chapter 11

Human Eye and Colourful World

12

Chapter 12

Electricity

13

Chapter 13

Magnetic Effects of Electric Current

14

Chapter 14

Sources of Energy

15

Chapter 15

Our Environment

16

Chapter 16

Management of Natural Resources

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Study Important Questions for Class 10 Science Chapter 6 – Life Processes

Very Short Answer Questions                                                                              (1 Mark)

1. Amoeba shows following kind of nutrition –

  1. autotrophic

  2. holozoic

  3. saprotrophic

  4. parasitic

Ans: (b) holozoic 


2. The process by which blood is cleared of metabolic wastes in case of kidney failure is called

  1. artificial kidney

  2. dialysis

  3. transplantation

  4. filtration

Ans: b) dialysis


3. Woody plants carry gaseous exchange through

  1. root hair

  2. stem hair

  3. Lenticels

  4. epidermal cells.

Ans: (c) Lenticels.


4. Where does digestion of starch begin in human body?

Ans: The digestion of starch begins in the human body in the mouth.


5. Give one example of each of saprophytic and parasitic nutrition.

Ans: One example each of saprophytic and parasitic nutrition is as follows:

Parasitic Nutrition – Plasmodium (Protozoa) 

Saprophytic Nutrition – fungi.


6. Which of the following statements about the autographs is incorrect?

  1. They store carbohydrates in the form of starch.

  2. They constitute the first trophy level in food chains.

  3. They convert $\text{C}{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}}}$ and water into carbohydrates in the absence of sunlight

  4. They synthesize carbohydrates from $\text{C}{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}}}$ and water in the presence of sunlight & chlorophyll.

Ans: c) They convert $C{{O}_{2}}$ and water into carbohydrates in the absence of sunlight.


7.  Which of these is not a part of the small intestine?

  1. Duodenum

  2. Jejunum

  3. Ileum

  4. Rectum 

  Ans: d) Rectum is not a part of the small intestine.


8. During contraction of the heart, what prevents backflow of blood?

  1. Thin walls of atria

  2. Thick muscular walls of ventricles

  3. Valves in heart

  4. All of the above 

 Ans: c) Valves in heart


9. Name excretory organs in amoeba and earthworm.

Ans: The excretory organ in amoeba and earthworms are as follows:

Amoeba – Cell membrane, Earthworm – Outer covering (skin)


10. Name the plant tissue through which water and minerals are transported in plants.

Ans: The plant tissue through which water and minerals are transported in plants is Xylem.


11. Trachea do not collapse when there is not much air because they are –

  1. thick and muscular

  2. having cartilaginous rings

  3. have valves

  4. supported by the larynx.

Ans: b) having cartilaginous rings.


12. Which one of the following blood vessels contains only deoxygenated blood?

  1. pulmonary vein

  2. pulmonary artery

  3. capillaries

  4. Aorta

Ans: b) Pulmonary artery 


13. The autotrophic mode of nutrition requires –

  1. Chlorophyll

  2. Sunlight

  3. Carbon – dioxide & water

  4. All of the above 

  Ans: d) All of the above


14. Name the red pigment carrying oxygen in the blood.

Ans: The red pigment carrying oxygen in blood Haemoglobin.


15. Name the hormone which is responsible for the reabsorption of water in nephrons.

Ans: The hormone which is responsible for reabsorption of water in nephrons Antidiuretic – hormone (ADH) or vasopressin.


16. When air is blown from the mouth into a test tube containing lime water, the lime water turned milky due to the presence of –

a) oxygen

b) nitrogen

c) water vapours

d) carbon – dioxide 

Ans: d) carbon – dioxide


17. In which of the following group/ groups of animals, heart does not pump oxygenated blood to different parts of the body?

  1. Pisces only

  2. Amphibians only

  3. Amphibians and reptiles only

  4. Pisces and amphibians

Ans: The following group/ groups of animals, in which the heart does not pump oxygenated blood to different parts of the body a) Pisces only.


18. The filtration units of kidneys are called –

  1. Ureter

  2. Urethra

  3. Neurons

  4. Nephrons.

Ans: d) nephrons


19. What is the mode of nutrition in fungi and plasmodium?

Ans: The mode of nutrition in fungi and plasmodium are as following:

Fungi – Saprophytic

Plasmodium – parasitic.


20. Which of them contain less nitrogenous waste – renal vein or the renal artery?

Ans: Renal veins contain less nitrogenous waste.


21. Amoeba captures food with the help of –

  1. Teeth

  2. cilia

  3. pseudopodia

  4. tentacles

Ans: c) pseudopodia.


22. Which of the following is most appropriate for aerobic respiration?

  1. $\text{Glucose}\xrightarrow{\text{mitochondria}}\text{pyruvate}\xrightarrow{\text{cytoplasm}}\text{C}{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}}}\text{+}{{\text{H}}_{\text{2}}}\text{O+Energy}$ 

  2. $\text{Glucose}\xrightarrow{\text{cytoplasm}}\text{pyruvate}\xrightarrow{\text{mitochondria}}\text{C}{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}}}\text{+}{{\text{H}}_{\text{2}}}\text{O+Energy}$

  3. $\text{Glucose}\xrightarrow{\text{cytoplasm}}\text{pyruvate+Energy}\xrightarrow{\text{mitochondria}}\text{C}{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}}}\text{+}{{\text{H}}_{\text{2}}}\text{O}$

  4. $\text{Glucose}\xrightarrow{\text{cytoplasm}}\text{pyruvate+Energy}\xrightarrow{\text{mitochondria}}\text{C}{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}}}\text{+}{{\text{H}}_{\text{2}}}\text{O+Energy}$

Ans: (b)    $\text{Glucose}\xrightarrow{cytoplasm}pyruvate\xrightarrow{mitochondria}C{{O}_{2}}+{{H}_{2}}O+Energy$.

 

23. Name the part of the alimentary canal that receives bile from the liver.

  1. Oesophagus

  2. Stomach

  3. Small intestine

  4. Large intestine 

Ans: The part of the alimentary canal that receives bile from the liver c) Small Intestine.


24. What is glycolysis?

Ans: Breakdown of Glucose into pyruvate is known as glycolysis.


25. Name the largest artery of the body.

Ans: The largest artery of the body is Aorta.


26. The kidneys in human beings are parts of the system for

  1. nutrition

  2. respiration

  3. excretion

  4. transpiration

  Ans: The kidneys in human beings are parts of the system for (c) excretion.


27. The xylem in plants are responsible for

  1. transport of water

  2. transport of food

  3. transport of amino acids

  4. transport of oxygen 

  Ans: (a) transport of water.


28. The autotrophic mode of nutrition requires

  1. carbon dioxide and water

  2. chlorophyll

  3. sunlight

  4. all of the above 

 Ans: The autotrophic mode of nutrition requires (d) all of the above.


29. The breakdown of pyruvate to give carbon dioxide, water and energy takes place in

  1. cytoplasm

  2. mitochondria

  3. chloroplast

  4. nucleus

 Ans: The breakdown of pyruvate to give carbon dioxide, water and energy takes place in (b) mitochondria.


30. Food moves down the gut by peristalsis. Which region of the brain controls peristalsis.

Ans: Food moves down the gut by peristalsis and the region of brain which controls peristalsis is the Medulla of the hindbrain.


31. Name the pigment present in plants, which can absorb solar energy.

Ans: The pigment present in plants, which can absorb solar energy is Chlorophyll.


32. Which of the four chambers of the human heart has the thickest muscular walls?

Ans: Right ventricle has the thickest muscular walls.


33. Which part of the visible spectrum is absorbed by chlorophyll pigments?

Ans: Blue and Red light are absorbed by chlorophyll pigments.


34. Name the cartilaginous flap which closes the glottis to check the entry of food into it during swallowing.

Ans: The cartilaginous flap which closes the glottis to check the entry of food into it during swallowing is Epiglottis.


35. Which equipment is used to facilitate breathing during serious breathing problems?

Ans: The equipment that is used to facilitate breathing during serious breathing problems is Ventilator.


36. What do you mean by double circulation of blood?

Ans: Double circulation of blood means that blood passes through the heart twice for each cycle of the body.


Short Answer Questions                                                                                     (2 Marks)

1. What is common for cuscuta, ticks and leeches?

Ans: Cuscuta, ticks, and leeches all feed in a parasitic manner, harming their hosts in the process.


2. What advantage over an aquatic organism does a terrestrial organism have with regard to obtaining oxygen for respiration?

Ans: Terrestrial organisms have evolved to be more efficient at absorbing oxygen from the air than watery organisms. –

  1. Increased respiratory surface area.

  2. Very fine and delicate surface for easy exchange of oxygen and carbon – dioxide.

  3. Placement of respiratory surface within the body for protection.

  4. The mechanism for transporting air into and out of the respiratory surface, which absorbs oxygen.


3. Differentiate between single and double circulation found in vertebrates.

Ans: The differences between single and double circulation found in vertebrates are:

Single Circulation

Double circulation

1. In this, blood passes only once through the heart in one complete cycle.

1. Blood passes only once through the heart in one complete cycle.

2. Only deoxygenated blood flows via the heart.

2. The blood in the heart is both oxygenated and deoxygenated.

3. It is ineffective.

3. It's more effective.


4. Name the substrates for the following enzymes.

  1. trypsin

  2. amylase

  3. pepsin

  4. lipase

Ans: The substrates for the following enzymes are as shown below

a) Protein

b) Starch

c) Protein

d) Lipids


5. What are the two stages in photosynthesis?

Ans: Two stages in photosynthesis are–

  1. Light reaction – Photolysis of water is the process of breaking down water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen using light energy.

  2. Dark reaction – Carbon dioxide ($C{{O}_{2}}$) is fixed and converted into glucose, a simple carbohydrate.


6. What is the difference between arteries & veins?

Ans: The differences between arteries & veins are:

Arteries

Veins

1. It is responsible for transporting blood away from the heart.

1. It transports blood to the heart.

2. They have very thin walls.

2. They have a sturdy wall around them.

3. They have narrow lumen.

3. They have a wide lumen.

4. Pressure is high.

4. Pressure is low.

5. It carries oxygenated blood.

5. It carries deoxygenated blood.


7. What is villi? What are its functions?

Ans: Villi are projections in the small intestine's inner lining that resemble fingers. They enhance the surface area available for digested meal absorption in the small intestine.


8. What type of respiration takes place in human muscles during vigorous exercise and why?

Ans: Anaerobic respiration occurs in human muscles during severe exercise. During exercise, our energy requirement increases, so our striated muscles start respiring anaerobically in the lack of oxygen and produce ATP molecules.


9. How is opening and closing of stomata regulated?

Ans: Guard cells control the closure and opening of the stomata. The stomata open when the guard cells enlarge or become turgid owing to water ingress. Because of the loss of water, the guard cells shrink and the stomata close.


10. State two vital functions of the kidney.

Ans: Function of the kidney are –

  1.  It keeps the body's water balance in check.

  2. It regulates calcium levels in the blood to keep bones healthy.


11. Differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

Ans: The differences between aerobic and anaerobic respiration are:

Aerobic Respiration

Anaerobic Respiration

1. In the presence of oxygen, it occurs.

1. It happens when oxygen isn't present.

2. It can be found in the cytoplasm and mitochondria.

2. It's found in the cytoplasm.

3. Complete breakdown of glucose.

3. Incomplete breakdown of glucose.

4. End products are $C{{O}_{2}}$ and ${{H}_{2}}O$.

4. End products are $C{{O}_{2}}$ and ethyl alcohol or lactic acid.


12. Meat is easier to digest as compared to grass. Why?

Ans: Meat is easier to digest because our digestive juices contain enzymes that can break down meat, but our bodies cannot break down cellulose, which is a major component of grass.


13. Differentiate between transport of materials in xylem & phloem.

Ans: The differences between transport of materials in xylem & phloem are:

Xylem

Phloem

1. It transports water and minerals.

1. It transports food materials.

2. Only upwards transport of substances is possible.

2. Substances are transported in both upward and downward directions.


14. What is the role of the glomerulus in the kidney?

Ans: Glomerulus, like Bowman's Capsule, is a collection of capillaries found in the cup. It gets blood from the renal artery, which is responsible for transporting excretory wastes from the body to the kidney. It removes from the liver water, salts, glucose, urea, nitrogen-containing protein end products, and yellow bile components.


15. Why is it essential to match the blood groups of donors and receiver person before arranging transfusion of blood?

Ans: Blood RBCs carry both antigen and antibodies. If the blood is not matched before transfusion, the recipient's blood produces antibodies against the donor blood and destroys blood cells, resulting in a blood shortage and death.


16. Why is it necessary to separate oxygenated & deoxygenated blood in mammals & birds?

Ans: The separation of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood allows the organism to receive adequate oxygen. This mechanism is beneficial to creatures who demand a lot of energy. Mammals and birds use oxygen to obtain energy in order to maintain a consistent body temperature.


17. Why are the walls of the trachea supported by cartilaginous rings?

Ans: The trachea is held together by cartilaginous rings that keep it from collapsing even when there isn't much air in it.


18. What are the raw materials for photosynthesis?

Ans: Raw materials for photosynthesis are –

  1. Carbon – dioxide

  2. Water

  3. Chlorophyll and Sunlight


19. What is the role of the diaphragm during inhalation and exhalation?

Ans: During inhalation and exhalation, the diaphragm changes form, increasing and decreasing the capacity of the thoracic cavity. This causes air to enter and exit the lungs.


20. What is the advantage of four chambers of heart?

Ans: A septum separates the right and left halves of the heart, preventing oxygenated and deoxygenated blood from mingling. This satisfies their constant need for energy to keep their body temperature steady. Their energy requirements are substantial, which are met effectively due to the non-mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood.


21. Why is diffusion insufficient to meet the oxygen requirements of multicellular organisms like humans?

Ans: As all cells in multicellular animals are not in direct contact with the environment, simple diffusion is insufficient to supply the needs of all body cells.


22. What criteria do we use to decide whether something is alive?

Ans: To be considered alive, all living organisms must have movement at the molecular level, as well as respiration and other life processes such as nutrition, respiration, transportation, and excretion.


23. What is the function of digestive enzymes?

Ans: Enzymes break down food's different complicated components into simple, soluble components that can be easily absorbed.


24. How are the lungs designed in human beings to maximize the area for exchange of gases?

Ans: Bronchioles end in alveoli, which are balloon-like structures in the lungs. Alveoli have a network of blood capillaries that increase the surface area available for gas exchange.


25. What is the role of saliva in the digestion of food?

Ans: Salivary amylase is an enzyme found in the mouth that breaks down starch, a complicated molecule, into glucose.


26. While eating you are advised not to talk. Why are you advised to do so?

Ans: We are urged to do so because food particles may enter the windpipe when eating, causing choking.


27. We say that movement is a characteristic of living organisms but we always don’t see visible movements in plants. Comment.

Ans: Plants do not always show obvious movement. It doesn't necessarily imply that they aren't living. In their bodies, molecular movements take place.


28. If a person is working on a treadmill in a gymnasium, will it affect his rate of breathing? How?

Ans: Yes, it will have an impact on his breathing rate. To satisfy the increased demand for energy, the rate of breathing will increase in order to supply more oxygen.


29. If you compare your rate of breathing by feeling your chest movement with the number of times a fish opens and closes its mouth. Which will be higher and way?

Ans: As the amount of dissolved oxygen in water is relatively low compared to the amount of oxygen in the air, the number of times a fish opens and closes its mouth will be higher. As a result, aquatic organisms breathe at a significantly higher rate than terrestrial organisms.


30. Mucus is not used for churning the food or digesting it. Then why is it secreted in the stomach?

Ans: In order to protect the stomach's inner lining from being harmed by HCI, mucus is released. Excessive HCI secretion can harm the lining of the stomach and cause a peptic ulcer.


31. In the process of Photosynthesis food A is prepared which gets converted into food B. What are A and B? Why is A converted to B?

Ans: Glucose is food A, whereas starch is food B. As B is an insoluble carbohydrate, it is transformed to A. It is more compact, making it better for storage.


32. When we are asleep we are not performing any activity while our life processes are going on. Why?

Ans: “The maintenance functions of living organisms must go on even when they are not doing anything particular.” That is why the life processes are going on even while we are asleep or not performing any activity.


33. What will be the outcome if a farmer floods his field every day?

Ans: The oxygen contained in the interspaces of the soil will be replaced by water, affecting plant respiration.


34. Name the respiratory organs of:

(i) fish 

Ans: The respiratory organs of fish are gills. 

(ii) mosquito 

Ans: The respiratory organs of mosquitoes are Trachea (air tubes).

(iii) earthworm.

Ans: The respiratory organs of earthworms are moist skin.


35. Due to the availability of less water, how does the plant cope with the lack of water in desert conditions?

Ans: To preserve moisture, they open their stomata at night and close them during the day.


36. After a vigorous exercise, you may experience cramps in your leg muscles. Why does this happen?

Ans: Leg muscle cramps are produced by a sudden build-up of lactic acid in our muscles following strenuous exercise.


37. What will happen if carbon monoxide combines with hemoglobin?

Ans: If haemoglobin binds firmly to carbon monoxide, oxygen will not be transported by blood, resulting in the organism's death.


38. Chloroplasts are called energy convertors. Explain.

Ans: As chloroplasts catch solar energy and convert it to chemical energy, they are known as energy converters.


39. Why is the rate of breathing much faster in aquatic organisms than those in terrestrial organisms?

Ans: Aquatic species get their oxygen from dissolved oxygen in the water. Water has a relatively low oxygen availability as compared to air. As a result, aquatic organisms must breathe more quickly than terrestrial organisms.


40. Why are glomeruli considered as dialysis bags?

Ans: The glomeruli's major filtering function is selective filtration. Small molecules comprising glucose, salts, urea, and liquid senim are filtered. Etc. Proteins and other big molecules remain in the blood. As a result, the glomeruli of the kidneys serve as dialysis bags.


41. Autotrophs synthesize food for the living world. Justify this statement in one sentence only by interconnecting autotrophs and heterotrophs.

Ans: The food producers are autotrophs, and all heterotrophs directly or indirectly consume the food produced by the autotrophs.


42. Veins and arteries carry blood. Which of these carry blood?

  1. Away from the heart?

Ans: Arteries carry blood away from the heart.

  1. Back to the heart?

Ans: Veins carry blood back to the heart.


43. Which of the organs perform the following functions in humans?

  1. Absorption of food.

Ans: Absorption of food takes place in the small intestine.

  1. Absorption of water

Ans: Large intestine


44. Name the areas in a woody stem through which respiratory exchange of gases take place.

Ans: In a woody stem, the bark has lenticels for gaseous exchange.


45. Why doesn’t the lungs collapse even after forceful expiration?

Ans: Even after forced expiration to maximum capacity, residual volume refers to the amount of air that remains in the lungs following forceful expiration. As a result, even after a strong expiration, the lungs do not collapse.


46. “If there were no algae there would be no fish in the sea”. Comment.

Ans: Photosynthesis results in the production of ${{O}_{2}}$ by algae. The oxygen used by fish in the sea is used for breathing. There would have been no oxygen created if algae had not existed. As a result, fish may have died.


47. Why is the process of diffusion insufficient to meet the oxygen requirement of human beings?

Ans: For bigger multicellular creatures like humans, the diffusion method is insufficient to transport ${{O}_{2}}$ to all areas of the body. As a result, the respiratory pigment haemoglobin absorbs oxygen from the air and transports it throughout our bodies via blood.


Long Answer Questions                                                                                          (3 Marks)

1. What are the functions of lymph in our body?

Ans: Functions of lymph are-

a) It removes tissue fluid from the interstitial region and restores it to the bloodstream.

b) Through tissue fluid, it gathers carbon dioxide, waste products, and metabolites from tissues.

c) Lymph contains lymphocytes (WBCs), which aid in the body's immunity and fight against invading invaders.


2. How is haemoglobin associated with respiration explained?

Ans: The respiratory pigment haemoglobin is responsible for transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide. Haemoglobin is a crimson pigment with a strong oxygen affinity. Oxyhemoglobin transports oxygen from the lungs to the cells of the body. Carbon dioxide is carried to the lungs by carbamino – haemoglobin from the bodily cells.


3. What are the modes of excretion in plants?

Ans: Modes of excretion in plants are –

  1. The plants get rid of excess water by transpiration.

  2. Plants' only primary gas excretory product is oxygen. Plants emit it into the environment by diffusion. Organic wastes of plants are stored within dead permanent tissues such as wood or within leaves or bark which are periodically removed.

  3. The plants also excrete some waste substances into the soil around them.

  4. Plant waste products are accumulated in cellular vacuoles in large quantities.


4. Give an experiment to prove the essentiality of light for photosynthesis. 

Ans: An experiment to prove the essentiality of light for photosynthesis is as shown below:

a) Destarched the plant by leaving it in dart for 48 – 72 hours.

b) Now place strips of black paper or metal foil over destarched leaves and expose them to light for several hours.


5. What is “translocation”? Why it is essential for plants.

Ans: The term "translocation" refers to the movement of organic solutes within plants. It is required since all cells require sustenance to perform their essential tasks. It affects the storage organs of roots, fruits, seeds, and developing organs in both upward and downward directions.


6. How respiration takes place in plants?

Ans: There are three modes for the exchange of gases in plants –

a) Some little plants can exchange gaseous matter by simply diffusing it throughout their entire surface.

b) Stomata on the leaves and green stems of large flowering plants exchange gases.

c) Exchange occurs in woody stems through fractures in the bark or lenticels.


7. How is transpiration pull responsible for upward movement of water?

Ans: Transpiration is the process through which leaves lose water in the form of water vapours through stomata. Continuous transpiration causes a suction in the xylem elements' water column, which reaches the roots. This is known as transpiration pull. The water column of the plant is drawn up from the bottom to the top due to transpiration.


8. Discuss the major steps involved in the process of nutrition in human beings.

Ans: Major steps involved in human nutrition are –

a) Ingestion – Food is taken in through the mouth. Humans have a holozoic feeding mode. Solid particles are swallowed by them.

b) Digestion – In the alimentary canal, mechanical and chemical processes are used to break down complex dietary materials into simpler ones.

c) Absorption – The little finger-like projections, or villi, of the small intestine absorb digested food.

d) Assimilation – Food is absorbed and transported to all cells via blood, where it is used for energy, growth, and development.

e) Excretion – Food from the small intestine passes through to the big intestine, where it is ejected out by Anus.


9. Discuss the mode of nutrition in amoeba.

Ans: The steps of Nutrition in amoeba are–

a) Formation of pseudopodia – When an amoeba comes into contact with a food particle, it creates pseudopodia that encase the food particle.

b) Ingestion – Ingestion occurs when the terminals of pseudopodia merge with one other, forming a food vacuole with a variable amount of food particles and water.

c) Digestion – The vacuoles are encircled by lysosomes, which fuse with the vacuole and consume the food particles inside.

d) Exocytosis – The food vacuole passes the soluble products of digestion into the appropriate cytoplasm. Exocytosis is the process through which the remaining undigested items are passed out of the body.


10. With the help of a labelled diagram, discuss the structure of the cross–section of leaf.

Ans: Leaf has two parts:

  1. Epidermis – The epidermis is the cell's outermost layer. Stomata are tiny pores that connect cells in the lower epidermis.

  2. Mesophyll – Mesophyll refers to the chloroplast-containing parenchyma cells. Palisade and spongy parenchyma are the two types.


11. What do you mean by ‘lymph’? Mention its function.

Ans: Lymph- Tissue fluid, or lymph, is the fluid that fills the gaps between the cells in the tissues.

Functions of lymph:

  1. It returns tissue fluid from the interstitial spaces into the blood.

  2. Lacteals, which are lymph capillaries found in intestinal villi, aid in fat absorption.

  3. Through tissue fluid, it gathers carbon dioxide, waste products, and metabolites from tissues.


12. How are lungs designed in human beings to maximize the area of exchange of gases?

Ans: Lungs have evolved various characteristics to allow for effective gas exchange. The modifications are as follows:

  1. Increased surface area

  2. Very fine and delicate surface for easy exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide

  3. The mechanism for transporting air into and out of the respiratory surface, which absorbs oxygen.

 

13. Dark reactions of photosynthesis do not need light. Do plants undergo dark reactions at night?

Ans: The term "dark reaction" does not refer to a reaction that occurs in the absence of light, such as at night. In fact, these reactions are independent of light energy and occur at the same time as light reactions.


14. Differentiate inhalation and exhalation.

 Ans: The differences between inhalation and exhalation are:

Inhalation

Exhalation

1. It is taking in of air from the atmosphere

1. It is expelling out of the air from the lungs.

2. Diaphragm contract & flattens.

2. Diaphragm relaxes and becomes dome shaped.

3. Ribs movement is forward & outward.

3. Ribs movement is downward & inward

4. Volume of thoracic cavity increases

4. Volume of thoracic cavity  decreases

5. Pressure of thoracic cavity decreases

5. Pressure of thoracic cavity increases


15. With the help of a diagram, show pulmonary circulation in man.

Ans: With the help of a diagram, pulmonary circulation in man can be represented as shown below:


Pulmonary circulation in man


16. What are the functions of the human respiratory system?

Ans: The functions of the human respiratory system are:

(i). The cellular respiration function requires gaseous exchange.

(ii). The vocal cords produce sound.

(iii). Abdominal compression assists with urination, face passing, and birthing.

(iv). Laughing and sneezing to clean the respiratory surface on their own.


17. What is the role of skin, lungs and intestine in the process of excretion in man?

Ans: The role of skin, lungs and intestine in the process of excretion in man are:

Skin – Skin excrete excess salts and water in the form of sweat.

Lungs – Exhalation causes carbon dioxide to be expelled from the lungs.

Intestine – Intestine throw out undigested food in the form of faeces through the anus


18. Explain the structure of chloroplast.

Ans: The structure of chloroplast can be explained using the diagram as shown below:


(Image will be uploaded soon)



19. Why and how does water enter continuously into the root xylem of plants?

Ans: Water and minerals are transported to the plant body via xylem. Root hairs are hairs that grow on a plant's roots. The root hairs come into close touch with the water film that forms between soil particles. Diffusion allows water and minerals to penetrate the root hair. The water and minerals are taken by the root hair from the soil move via the epidermis, root cortex, endodermis, and root xylem by osmosis from cell to cell. The plant's xylem vessels in the root are connected to the xylem vessels in the stem. As a result, dissolved mineral-containing water passes through the root xylem vessels and into the stem xylem vessels. The stem's xylem vessels branch out into the plant's leaves. As a result, the water and minerals supplied by the xylem vessels in the stem reach the leaves via the branched xylem vessels that enter each area of the leaf from the petiole. As a result, water and minerals from the earth reach the plants' leaves via the root and stem. The suction created by the evaporation of water molecules from the cells of a leaf pulls water from the xylem cells of roots. Transpiration is the loss of water from the aerial portions of plants in the form of vapour.


20. What is the role of following in human digestive system –

  1. mucous

Ans: Mucus – It shields the stomach's inner life from HCl.

  1. Bicarbonate

Ans: Bicarbonate – It alkalizes the acidic meal so that pancreatic enzymes may work on it.

  1. Trypsin

  Ans: Trypsin – It digest proteins into amino acids.


21. What are outside raw materials used for by an organism?

Ans: The following are examples of external raw materials used by an organism:

  1. Food

  2. Water

  3. Oxygen


22. What processes would you consider essential for maintaining life?

Ans: The processes essential for maintaining life are:

  1. Nutrition

  2. Respiration

  3. Transportation

  4. Excretion


23. What is the difference between autotrophic and heterotrophic nutrition?

Ans: The difference between autotrophic and heterotrophic nutrition is:

Autotrophic Nutrition

Heterotrophic Nutrition

1. The form of nutrition in which an organism uses sunlight energy to produce its own food from simple inorganic components such as carbon dioxide and water found in the environment. All green plants.

1. The mode of nutrition in which an organism is unable to produce food from simple inorganic components such as carbon dioxide and water and must rely on food from other species. All non-green plants.


24. Where do plants get each of the raw materials required for photosynthesis?

Ans: Plants do get each of the raw materials required for photosynthesis from:

a) Carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

b) Light from Sun

c) Water from Soil

d) Chlorophyll from chloroplast of green plants.


25. What is the role of acids in our stomach?

Ans: HCl plays the following role in our stomach:

  1. Make the medium acidic to allow the pepsin enzyme to work.

  2. Kills the harmful bacteria present in food

  3. Prevents fermentation of food


26. How is small intestine designed to absorb digested?

Ans: The villi, which are finger-like projections on the inner lining of the small intestine, enhance the surface area available for absorption. The villi are densely packed with blood arteries that convey the absorbed food to all of the body's cells. It is used to obtain energy and repair damaged tissues.


27. What advantage over an aquatic organism does a terrestrial organism have with regard to obtaining oxygen for respiration?

Ans: In comparison to aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms breathe at a slower rate. This is owing to the fact that there is less oxygen in water than there is in air, thus aquatic species breathe at a faster rate.


28. What are different ways in which glucose is oxidized to provide energy in various organisms?

Ans: The pathways of break-down of glucose in various organisms are as below: 


(Image will be uploaded soon)

 

29. How is oxygen and carbon dioxide transported in human beings?

Ans: In humans, the pigment haemoglobin is found in RBC and has a high affinity for oxygen. It absorbs oxygen from the air in the lungs and transports it to tissues that are oxygen-deficient. In blood plasma, some oxygen is carried in a dissolved condition. Because carbon dioxide is more soluble in water than oxygen, it is usually carried through human blood as a dissolved form.


30. What are the components of the transport system in human beings? What are the functions of these components?

Ans: The components of the human transport system include:

  1. Heart- receives and pumps the blood.

  2. Arteries- carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to various organs:

  3. Veins- Bring back blood to the heart.

  4. Capillaries- exchange of various materials and gases between blood and tissues.


31. Why is it necessary to separate oxygenated and deoxygenated blood in mammals and birds?

Ans: The right and left sides of the heart are separated to prevent oxygenated and deoxygenated blood from mingling. This separation allows for a very effective oxygen supply to the organism. This is important in creatures with high energy needs, such as birds and mammals, that use energy to maintain their body temperature all of the time.


32. What are the components of the transport system in highly organized plants?

Ans: The xylem and phloem transport systems are found in higher plants. Water and minerals are transported from the root to different parts of the plant via vessels and tracheids in xylems. Food is transported from leaves to storage organs and other sections of the plant by phloem, which is made up of sieve tubes and companion cells.


33. How are water and minerals transported in plants?

Ans: Plants transport water and minerals through the xylem, which is made up of tracheids and vessels. Osmosis transports water and minerals received by root hairs to the xylem tissues of the root. Water travels from the root xylem to the stem xylem and then to the leaves.


34. How is food transported in plants?

Ans: Plants carry food via the phloem, which is made up of sieve tubes, sieve cells, and companion cells. Food is prepared in leaves and transferred to the phloem of the leaves in a soluble form. Food is actively transported to all other areas of the plant.


35. What are the methods used by plants to get rid of excretory products?

Ans: The methods used by plants to get rid of excretory products are:

(i) During respiration, plants produce carbon dioxide as a waste product, and photosynthesis produces oxygen as a waste product.

  1. Excess water is removed through transpiration.

  2. Some waste products like gums and resins are stored in older xylem tissue.


36. How is the amount of urine produced regulated?

Ans: The amount of urine produced is determined by the amount of excess water in the body and the amount of water-soluble waste to be expelled. When the amount of water and dissolved waste in a boy is high, the amount of urine generated is high, and when the amount of wastes is low, the amount of urine produced is low.


37. How are fats digested in our bodies? Where does this process take place?

Ans: The small intestine is where lipids are digested. The fats that enter the intestine take the form of big globules. These huge globules are broken down into smaller globules by bile juice. Following that, the fat-digesting enzyme lipase, which is found in pancreatic and intestinal juice, turns it into fatty acids and glycerol.


38. What are the necessary conditions for autotrophic nutrition and what are its by-products?

Ans: Conditions necessary for autotrophic nutrition are:

  1. Light

  2. Chlorophyll

  3. Water and

  4. Carbon dioxide 

  By-products are:

  1. Oxygen and

  2. Water


39. What are the differences between aerobic and anaerobic respiration? Name some organisms that use anaerobic mode of respiration.

Ans: The differences between aerobic and anaerobic respiration are:

Aerobic Respiration

Anaerobic Respiration

1. In the presence of oxygen, it occurs.

1. It happens when oxygen isn't present.

2. It can be found in the cytoplasm and mitochondria.

2. It's found in the cytoplasm.

3. Complete breakdown of glucose.

3. Incomplete breakdown of glucose.

4. End products are $C{{O}_{2}}$ and ${{H}_{2}}O$.

4. End products are $C{{O}_{2}}$ and ethyl alcohol or lactic acid.

Yeast, bacteria, and some internal parasites, such as tapeworms, use anaerobic respiration.


40. How are the alveoli designed to maximize the exchange of gases?

Ans: The nostril, larynx, nasal chamber, pharynx, trachea, epiglottis, alveoli, bronchioles, bronchi, and lungs make up the human respiratory tract. Through millions of small sacs known as alveoli, oxygen is exchanged for carbon dioxide waste within the lungs. Inhaled oxygen diffuses into the lungs' capillaries, binds to haemoglobin, and is pumped into the bloodstream. Exhalation allows the carbon dioxide from the blood to diffuse through the alveoli and be evacuated. To promote the exchange of gases between blood and the air-filled alveoli, the alveoli have thin walls and are richly supplied with a network of blood veins. They have a balloon-like shape to maximise gas exchange surface area. The alveolar walls are folded and have a significant surface area. It has a large network of blood arteries that serve as a surface for gas exchange.


41. What would be the consequence of a deficiency of haemoglobin in our bodies?

Ans: Haemoglobin is a pigment found in red blood cells. It has a strong preference for oxygen. It transports oxygen from the lungs to other tissues that are oxygen-deficient. The presence of less haemoglobin reduces the oxygen supply to tissues. A person with low haemoglobin levels will become exhausted quickly and seem pale.


42. What are the differences between the transport of materials in xylem and phloem?

Ans: The differences between the transport of materials in xylem and phloem are:

Xylem

Phloem

1. It transports water and minerals from roots to leaves.

1. It transport food materials from leaves to root and storage organs

2. Only upwards transport of substances is possible.

2. Substances are transported in both upward and downward directions.

3. It consists of tracheids and vessels.

3. It consists of sieve tubes and companion cells.


43. Compare the functioning of alveoli in the lungs and nephron in the kidneys with respect to their structure and functioning.

Ans: Comparison between alveoli and nephron:

Alveoli

Nephron

1. They have thin-walled balloon-like structures. The alveoli provide a surface extensively supplied with body capillaries for the exchange of gases in the lungs. Carbon dioxide is released in the cavity of alveoli and oxygen is taken by haemoglobin present in the RBC of blood.

1. Nephron is a cluster of very thin-walled blood capillaries found in the kidney, Each capillary’s cluster remains associated with the cup-shaped end of a tube called Bowman’s capsule that collects the filtered urine, at the same time the useful substances are reabsorbed.


44. Leaves of a healthy potted plant were coated with petroleum jelly. How will it affect the plant? State two reasons.

Ans: The plant will not remain healthy for long due to the following reasons:

  1. There will be no transpiration.

  2. There will be no exchange of gases which will affect the rate of photosynthesis.


45. How does respiration in plants differ from that in animals?

Ans: In plants, all portions such as the root, stem, and leaves do individual respiration, but in animals, either the general body surface or particular organs such as the skin, gills, and lungs perform respiration. Plants have a significantly slower rate of respiration than animals. Gases are not transported from one section of the plant to another way they are in animals.


46. How does respiration in plants differ from that in animals?

Ans: After eating sugary food (chocolates and sweets), acid is generated in the mouth. The pH of the mouth is lowered by this acid. When the pH of the acid generated in the mouth falls below, tooth decay begins. This is because the acid develops strong enough to attack and damage the enamel of our teeth.


47. Name the cartilaginous flap which closes the glottis to check the entry of food into it during swallowing.

Ans: It's possible that the tissue that became clogged was the xylem. Water and minerals taken by roots from the soil are carried to the leaves and other parts of the plant via the xylem. As a result, if the xylem is obstructed, the leaves will be deprived of nutrients and will wilt.


48. How does respiration in plants differ from that in animals?

Ans: In plants, all portions such as the root, stem, and leaves do individual respiration, but in animals, either the general body surface or particular organs such as the skin, gills, and lungs perform respiration. Plants have a significantly slower rate of respiration than animals. Gases are not transported from one section of the plant to another way they are in animals.


49. Write one feature which is common to each of the following pairs of the term/organs.

  1. glycogen and starch

  Ans: The feature that is common to the following pair is Carbohydrate (food).

  1. chlorophyll and haemoglobin

  Ans: The feature that is common to the following pair is Pigments.

  1. gills and lungs

  Ans: The feature that is common to the following pair is Respiratory organs.

  1. arteries and veins.

  Ans: The feature that is common to the following pair is Blood vessels.


50. A certain tissue in a green plant somehow gets blocked and the leaves wilted. What was the tissue that got blocked?

Ans: It's possible that the tissue that became clogged was the xylem. Water and minerals taken by roots from the soil are carried to the leaves and other parts of the plant via the xylem. As a result, if the xylem is obstructed, the leaves will be deprived of nutrients and will wilt.


51. Write the functions of the following in the digestive process:

  1. Bile

Ans: Bile: It is secreted by the gallbladder and it emulsifies & it into the smaller droplets for their easy digestion.

  1. Bicarbonate secreted by the duodenal wall.

Ans: It provides an alkaline medium in the duodenum which is needed for the action of pancreatic enzymes of different food components for their digestion.

  1. Pancreatic amylase.

  Ans: Pancreatic amylase enzyme digests starch and changes it into maltose.


52. The two openings of the pharynx, one leading to the trachea and the other leading to oesophagus, lie very close to each other. Yet food we swallow normally does not enter into our trachea. Why?

Ans: The food does not enter the trachea because the aperture leading to the trachea (glottis) is covered by a cartilaginous flap termed the epiglottis during swallowing, leaving the food with no other option except to go down the oesophagus.


53. How would it affect the digestion of proteins and carbohydrates in the duodenum of man if there is a blockade in the pancreatic duct?

Ans: The pancreatic juice is secreted by the pancreas and enters the duodenum. Pancreatic amylase and trypsin are enzymes that aid in the digestion of carbohydrates and proteins. As a result, if there is a blockade, carbohydrate and protein digestion is impaired.


Long Answer Questions                                                                                             (5 Marks) 

1. What is ‘clotting of blood?’ Write a flow chart showing major events taking place in clotting of blood?

Ans: Formation of a clot at the site of injury to stop bleeding is known as ‘clotting of blood.’ Steps for clotting of blood  


(Image will be uploaded soon)


2. With the help of a labelled diagram of the human excretory system, Mention its important part and explain them.

Ans: A labelled diagram of the human excretory system mentioning its important part with a proper explanation is as displayed below:


Human Excretory System

1) Kidney – It is the excretory system's functional unit. About a million small coiled channels called nephrons make up each kidney. The basic filtration unit in the kidneys is the nephron. The glomerulus, Bowman's capsule, and convoluted tubule are the components.

2) Ureter – Wastes come out of the kidney into the ureter.

3) Urinary Bladder – The ureter pours its contents into a muscular sac called the urinary bladder.

4) Urethra – Urine flows from the bladder to the outside through the urethra.


3. 

(i) Draw a well-labelled diagram of the human digestive system

Ans: A well labelled diagram of the human digestive system is as shown below:


Human Digestive System

(ii) Describe the role of following in digestion.

  1. Bile

  Ans: Bile – emulsification of fats

  1. Salivary amylase

Ans: Salivary amylase – digest starch in the mouth

  1. HCl

  Ans: HCl – Activate pepsinogen by making medium acidic in stomata.


4. With the help of a labelled diagram, Discuss the mechanism of respiration in human beings.

Ans: Mechanism of Respiration – It occurs in the following steps


Breathing mechanism


  1. Breathing – Taking in oxygen and expelling carbon – dioxide out is called breathing. It involves the following steps –

  1. Inhalation – It is consuming oxygen. It happens when the muscles linked to the ribcage contract. The ribs are lifted and the diaphragm is flattened, increasing the volume of the thoracic cavity. As a result, the pressure inside the thoracic cavity drops, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

  2. Exhalation – It is the process of releasing carbon dioxide. It happens when the muscles linked to the ribs relax and the diaphragm is formed. This reduces the volume of the thoracic cavity, lowers air pressure, and expels air from the lungs.

b) Exchange of Gases – It takes place between the alveoli of the lungs and surrounding blood capillaries.

c) Transport of Gases in Blood – Haemoglobin is a protein that transports oxygen throughout the body. In the form of any haemoglobin, oxygen is transported from the lungs to the bodily cells.

d) Oxidation of Food – Break down of glucose molecules that produce energy. It occurs in chondria.


5. Describe an experiment to prove that carbon – dioxide is essential for the process of photosynthesis.

Ans: Experiment showing that carbon dioxide is essential for photosynthesis.

  1. Take a potted plant with elongated leaves

  2. Take an empty bottle and put a little amount of potassium hydroxide ($KOH$) in it.

  3. Now cut the cork of the bottle into two parts and place it on one of the leaves of the potted plant in between the two parts of the cork.

  4. Now put the bottle in the presence of sunlight for 72 – 96 hours.

  5. Now test the leaf for the presence of starch.


6. Describe the structure and functioning of nephron.

Ans: Each nephron is a collection of blood capillaries with very thin walls. Each glomerulus (capillary cluster) in the kidney is linked to the cup-shaped Bowman's capsule, which collects the filtered urine. The blood is filtered by the nephron to eliminate nitrogenous waste.


They also absorb some vital substances from the filtrate, including glucose, amino acids, minerals, and a significant amount of water.

(Image will be uploaded soon)


7. Describe double circulation in human beings. Why is it necessary?

Ans: During each cycle, blood passes through the heart twice in mammals and birds. Double circulation is the term for this situation.


Blood that has been deoxygenated enters the right auricle and then enters the right ventricle, where it is pushed to the lungs for oxygenation. It travels from the lungs to the left auricle, where it is oxygenated, and then to the left ventricle, where it is pumped to various regions of the body.


Such a circulatory system prevents the mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood, allowing for an effective supply of oxygen to the body


Class 10 Science Chapter 6 Important Questions - Free PDF Download

The Class 10 Science Ch 6 Important Questions PDF are the best guide for the students. The questions will help you have a good grip over the chapter. Chapter 6 Science Class 10 Important Questions are designed solely for providing the students with a proper understanding of the chapter. With these questions’ correct practice, you can achieve a better score and increase your overall percentage. Chapter 6 is based on the life processes inside the human body and the plant body. And it can be confusing to remember the different organs and their functions. To make the learning more comfortable, we have designed the Important Questions of Ch 6 Science Class 10. The PDF of the important questions are available on Vedantu website for free.

Students of all calibre can refer to the Important Questions of Chapter 6 Science Class 10. These questions are prepared as per the latest guidelines of CBSE board. It will clarify the doubts of the students and will also help them understand the pattern of examination.


Further if you want to brush up on the topics of CBSE Class 10 Science Chapter 6 - Life Processes, read the table below, as it contains all the important topics and subtopics included in the chapter. 

Topics

Subtopics

What are Life Processes?

  • Life processes in single-celled organisms

  •  Life processes in multicellular organisms

Nutrition

  • How do living things get their food?

  • Autotrophic nutrition

  • Heterotrophic nutrition

  • How do organisms obtain their nutrition?

  • Nutrition in human beings

Respiration

  • Anaerobic respiration

  •  Aerobic respiration

Transportation

  • Transportation in human beings

  1. Our pump — the heart

  2. Oxygen enters the blood in the lungs

  3. The tubes – blood vessels

  4. Maintenance by platelets

  5. Lymph

  • Transportation in plants

  1. Transport of water

  2. Transport of food and other substances

Excretion 

  • Excretion in human beings

  • Excretion in plants


Important Questions For Class 10 Science Chapter 6, Life Processes

In chapter 6 of science, students will learn about the different set of life processes in the human body. The chapter also explains the different parts of the human organ system and its functions. By practising the important questions for Class 10 Science Chapter 6, students can learn new things as well as get a detailed overview of the chapter. Some of the topics covered under the chapter are as follows:


Life Processes

Earth is the only planet in the solar system that supports life. We can distinguish between living organisms and other inanimate objects based on different parameters of life processes.

Life processes refer to those processes that help in the maintenance of life. The processes are responsible for keeping the body in a well and healthy manner. These processes help in the development of living organisms. The important life processes are nutrition, respiration, excretion and circulation. These processes work in a coordinated manner to assist in the sustenance of life. In unicellular organisms, the life processes are carried out by a single cell, whereas, in multicellular organisms, these processes are carried out by different organ systems.


Nutrition

Nutrition can be defined as the process of acquiring food and other minerals that are required for the nourishment and maintenance of living organisms. The modes through with a living organism can obtain nutrition are: Autotrophic and Heterotrophic.

Autotrophic Nutrition - It is a type of nutrition in which a living organism can nurture itself by preparing its food. This type of nutrition is generally found in green plants as they can prepare their food in the presence of sunlight and other chemicals.

Heterotrophic Nutrition - It is a type of nutrition in which a living organism derives its nourishment from other organisms. This mode of nutrition can be subdivided into three categories, Holozoic Nutrition, Saprophytic Nutrition, and Parasitic Nutrition.


Digestive System in Humans

Human beings can consume both plant products as well as animal products. And to digest the complex food particles, humans have a complex digestive system. The digestive system in humans consists of an alimentary canal along with other digestive organs that function together to provide proper nourishment to the body. The human digestive system performs four main functions: ingestion, digestion, absorption and assimilation.

The digestive system has various organs that function together to help in the digestion of food. Some of the important organs of the digestive system are: Alimentary canal, Mouth, Oesophagus, Stomach, Small intestine, Large Intestine, and there are sever digestive glands that produce digestive juices for the proper digestion of food, they are Salivary gland, Gastric glands, Liver, Gallbladder, and Pancreas.


Respiration System in Humans

Respiration can be defined as the exchange of gases that takes place in the human body. The process of respiration takes place differently in different organisms.

Respiration in cellular level in an organism means the burning of food for the generation of energy to support the life processes. At cellular level respiration can be divided into two subtypes: Aerobic respiration and Anaerobic respiration.

The human respiratory system is complex and consists of various organs. It consists of the nose, nasal cavities, pharynx, larynx, windpipe or trachea, then comes the lungs which enclose the bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli. The human respiratory system is complex as it processes breathing, exchange of gases, and cellular respiration.


Circulation System in Humans

For their survival, every living organism requires certain components such as oxygen, water and food. All these components are needed by every living cell in the human body. So, they need to be transported to various parts of the body. Transportation in humans occurs with the help of the circulatory system.

The circulatory system is a complex system consisting of the blood, blood vessels and heart. The circulatory system is mainly responsible for the effective transmission of food, nutrients, oxygen. It helps in the effective removal of carbon dioxide and other waste materials from the body.

The circulatory system in plants involves the transportation of food, water and necessary nutrients to different parts of the plant. The transportation in plants is done by two tissues, namely xylem and phloem.

Xylem is responsible for the effective transmission of water, and it transports water in an upward direction only. Phloem is responsible for the transmission of food and other nutrients in the plants. The food and nutrients move in both upward and downward direction in the phloem.


Excretory System in Humans

Excretion is an essential function performed by the human body. Excretion means the effective removal of waste materials and other unuseful substances from the human body.

The excretory system in humans is the most complex and well-developed. It consists of a pair of kidneys, a pair of ureters, an urinary bladder and a urethra. All the organs of the excretory system work in unison to remove all the unwanted waste and other unuseful substances from the human body.

The excretion in plants takes place through the stomatal opening. The excretion in plants is mostly in the form of gases. The excess water is removed from the plants through transpiration.


Chapter 6 Class 10 Science Important Questions

To provide you with a proper understanding of the questions, we at Vedantu have provided some Important Questions on Chapter 6 in this article. These Life Processes Class 10 Important Questions will help you understand the exam pattern as well as the type of questions you will face in the exams.

  • What is the meaning of Life Processes?

  • What is Nutrition? Explain its types.

  • What is the meaning of Photosynthesis?

  • How does amoeba obtain nutrition?

  • Explain the digestive system in brief.

  • What are the different types of teeth? Explain their functions.

  • Explain small intestine along with its function.

  • Explain the role of HCL in Digestion.

  • What is Respiration?

  • Explain the Physiology of respiration.

  • Explain the Circulatory system in humans.

  • How does the excretion of waste material take place in the human body?


Benefits of Class 10th Science Chapter 6 Important Questions

Here are some points that explain the benefits of these important questions.

  • The Class 10 Science Chapter 6 Important Questions will provide the students with a brief comprehension of the chapter and clear all sorts of doubts.

  • The Class 10 Science Ch 6 Important Questions are designed by experts at Vedantu, after thorough research. These questions have the highest probability of coming in the exams.

  • The questions come with proper answers and cover all the topics under the chapter.

  • These questions are prepared to keep in mind the latest guidelines of CBSE Board.


Conclusion

Chapter 6 Science Class 10 Important Questions are simplified and the most suitable study material for the students. The students can refer to these study materials for revisions and preparation of exams. The materials will provide them with a competitive edge and help them secure better grades.


Important Related Links for CBSE Class 10 Science

FAQs on Important Questions for CBSE Class 10 Science Chapter 6 - Life Processes 2024-25

1. How many chapters are there in CBSE Class 10 science book?

Ans: There are a total of 7 units in CBSE Class 10 science solutions book. Below is the list of units: 

Unit 1: Chemical Substances - Nature and Behaviour

  • Chemical reactions

  • Acids, bases and salts

  • Metals and non-metals

  • Carbon and compounds

  • Periodic classification of elements

Unit 2: World of Living

  • Life processes

  • Control and coordination in animals and plants

  • How do organisms reproduce

  • Control and coordination in animals

  • Reproduction

  • Heredity and evolution

Unit 3: Natural Phenomenon

  • Light

  • Refraction of light 

  • Reflection of light

  • The functioning of the human eye

Unit 4: Effects of Current

  • Effects of current

  • Magnetic effects of current

Unit 5: Natural Resources

  • Sources of Energy

  • Our environment

  • management of natural resources

Unit 6: How things work

Unit 7: Moving Things, People and Idea 


2. Give a brief description of evolution.

Ans:  Evolution:

In this part of Class 10 Science Chapter 9, you will not only learn about the evolution of humans but also the evolution of animals and birds. 

  1. Homologous and Analogous organs are the ones which are used in the evolutionary relationships of animals. 

  2. There are various stages of evolution. You shall read about the artificial selection, in which one particular species will evolve into various species. 

  3. Phylogeny is considered for the evolutionary relationship of biological species. 

  4. Humans from primates evolution is still a big mystery and here, you will learn some more details about it. 

Here, you will also understand what is somatic variation and Gametic variation and they occur in somatic cells and germ cells of the body. You will also read about the importance of variations and what are the causes of variations.

3. Explain about magnetic field and field lines.

Ans: Here, the topic discusses field and field lines where magnetics play a major role. Attraction or repulsion of objects can be seen in magnetic fields. Nickel, Iron and Cobalt are the best examples of magnetic fields. You will also read about: 

  1. North and south poles

  2. Like poles repel and unlike poles attract

  3. Bar magnet

  4. Magnetic field

  5. Magnetic field lines

  6. Iron filings test around a bar magnet

  7. No two magnetic field lines intersect

  8. The relative strength of magnetic field inferred from magnetic field lines

  9. Magnetic field lines form a closed-loop.

Here, the concept also educates you on the concentric circles which are used to represent at every point over a conductor. This will be explained to you with various experiments such as Oersted’s experiment, electromagnetism and electromagnet, magnetic field due to a straight current-carrying conductor, right-hand thumb rule, magnetic field due to current through a circular loop and magnetic field due to current in a solenoid.

4. Benefits of NCERT solutions with Vedantu?

Ans: These solutions are drafted by our Science experts with utmost care to make you’re learning more fun and interactive. You can score well if you have secured 100% confidence to answer any question asked from this chapter. They made sure that CBSE and NCERT guidelines are strictly followed while drafting these solutions.

 

Our NCERT solutions will help you in developing a strong conceptual foundation with all the important concepts in a very simple language. Solutions provided to the questions are crisp and concise with 100% accuracy in the exercises. They have been designed in such a way that through which you can expand your knowledge base, improve your learning skills and it clears all your doubts instantly.

5. What are the important topics in life processes according to Chapter 6 of Class 10 Science

Ans: Chapter 6 of Class 10 Science will help students to understand the different life processes. In this chapter, students will study the type of nutrition in different organisms. They will also study the concept of photosynthesis in detail. They will even study the process of digestion in human beings in detail and will learn about the different organs of the digestive system and how different organs help in the digestion of food. The process of excretion and how waste products are excreted out of the body is also a part of life processes. 

6. Why are life processes important?

Ans: Life processes are important for healthy living. Life processes such as respiration, digestion, absorption, assimilation, and excretion are vital for all living organisms. The processes may differ from one organism to another. Students of Class 10 science will learn about the different life processes in Chapter 6. It is an interesting chapter and an essential one if the student wants to pursue a career in Biology. 

7. If there is less air in the trachea, its walls do not collapse. Give a reason.

Ans: The trachea is a tube through which we breathe in air and give out carbon dioxide. The trachea is made up of small rings arranged in the form of C. The rings are muscular and made of connective tissue. Thus, the rings present in the trachea help prevent it from collapsing when there is no air in it. The muscular rings expand when air enters into it and contracts when air moves out of our lungs. For Important Questions of Chapter 6 of Class 10 Science, visit Vedantu website or mobile app and download the PDF free of cost.

8. What is the process of digestion and where does the complete digestion of various components of food take place?

Ans: Digestion of food takes place in different organs. In the mouth, the process starts by chewing food. Then it passes to the stomach for further digestion. The small intestine is the part where complete digestion of food takes place. Different juices and enzymes present in the different parts of the digestive system help in the complete digestion of the food. The digestion starts in the mouth and breaks into small molecules that are digested quickly in the stomach and other parts of the digestive system.

9. Explain how urine is produced?

Ans: Urine is the waste product excreted out of the body. Urine is produced in the kidneys. It consists of harmful substances. Therefore, it is necessary to pass out the waste products in the form of urine. Kidneys filter the blood and important substances such as glucose, amino acids, and salts are reabsorbed. Excess amounts of water present in the blood and other waste substances are converted into the urine and it is excreted out through the urinary system.