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The specific heat of water is 4.184 J/g times Celsius degree. How much heat is required to raise the temperature of 5.0 g of water by 3.0 degree Celsius?

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Last updated date: 20th Jun 2024
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Answer
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Hint:In order to answer a question, we must know a specific heat capacity is. Specific heat capacity is the amount of heat which is added to a substance of unit mass, in order to raise the temperature by one degree Celsius.

Complete answer:
Let us first understand about the heat capacity. It is the amount of heat which is required to raise the temperature of the substance by one degree Celsius. Now let us see what a specific capacity is. Specific heat capacity is the amount of heat which is added to a substance of unit mass, in order to raise the temperature by one degree Celsius. The quantity of specific heat is usually measured in Joules. We know that specific heat of water is around 4.184 \[J/{g^\circ }C\].
Now let us move onto the problem.
Write the equation of the specific heat capacity, i.e.,
\[Q = mc\Delta T\]……. (1)
Where Q is the energy in Joules
m is the mass in Grams
c is the specific heat capacity
\[\Delta T\]is the change in temperature.
Therefore, from the equation, we get
\[Q = (5 \times 4.184 \times 3) = 62.76J\].
62.76J of heat is required to raise the temperature.

Note:
Let us see some of the applications
- Cooling vessels are made of metals which have low specific capacity.
- Land and sea breezes make use of the principle of specific heat capacity.
- It is also used in the car radiators