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The crystals of Sodium chloride produces a crackling sound on heating, called ______

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Last updated date: 21st Jul 2024
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Answer
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Hint :The salt that is most responsible for the salinity of seawater and the extracellular fluid of many multicellular species is sodium chloride. Table salt is widely used as a condiment and food preservative in its edible form. Many industrial processes use large amounts of sodium chloride, and it is a major source of sodium and chlorine compounds used as feedstocks for further chemical syntheses. De-icing of roadways in sub-freezing conditions is a second major use of sodium chloride.

Complete Step By Step Answer:
The salt that is most responsible for the salinity of seawater and the extracellular fluid of many multicellular species is sodium chloride. Table salt is widely used as a condiment and food preservative in its edible form. Many industrial processes use large amounts of sodium chloride, and it is a major source of sodium and chlorine compounds used as feedstocks for further chemical syntheses. De-icing of roadways in sub-freezing conditions is a second major use of sodium chloride.
Sodium chloride is formed when sodium atoms interact with chlorine atoms. As a result, sodium will donate an electron (a negatively charged particle) to chlorine. The chemical formula for sodium chloride is NaCl, which means that each sodium atom has exactly one chloride atom.
Decrepitation is a crackling sound produced when larger sodium chloride crystals break up into smaller ones. As the crystals are heated, the water evaporates, causing the salt crystals to break as it escapes.
Decrepitation is one of the most precise methods for calculating a mineral-deposit scale, allowing for more sophisticated and enhanced hydrothermal system research. Fluid inclusions are important in decrepitation because they are microscopic areas of gas and liquid within crystals that decrepitate (or break) when heat is applied.
The liquid pressure is released when the crystal or salt is decrepitated, which can result in a crack. However, in some situations, the fluid inclusions are not completely decrepitated, necessitating the use of alternative methods.

Note :
Decrepitation is one of the most precise methods for calculating a mineral-deposit scale, allowing for more sophisticated and enhanced hydrothermal system research. Fluid inclusions are important in decrepitation because they are microscopic areas of gas and liquid within crystals that decrepitate (or break) when heat is applied.