$Na$ is obtained by electrolysis of aqueous $NaCl$ solution.
1. True
2. False

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Hint: In any chemical reaction anode is the electrode where oxidation occurs and the cathode is the electrode where reduction occurs. Oxidation is the loss of electrons (oxidation was originally used to describe a reaction in which an element combines with oxygen) and reduction is the gain of electrons.

Complete step by step answer:
Electrolysis is a chemical process of decomposition produced by passing an electric current through a liquid or solution containing ions.
When sodium chloride is dissolved in water it dissociates into ions. But in ionic solution water itself also undergo oxidation and reduction, so the substance which will be oxidized or reduced will not contain only sodium chloride ion but may also include water ion
At anode
$2{H_2}O(l) + 2{e^ - }\xrightarrow{{}}{H_2}(g) + 2O{H^ - }$
$N{a^ + }(l) + {e^ - }\xrightarrow{{}}Na(l)$
At cathode
$2{H_2}O(l)\xrightarrow{{}}{O_2}(g) + 4{H^ + } + 4{e^ - }$
$2C{l^ - }\xrightarrow{{}}C{l_2}(g) + 2{e^ - }$
So we can see
At cathode oxygen gas and chlorine gas are liberated. At anode sodium metal and hydrogen gas are liberated. But the reduction potential of $N{a^ + }$ is less than that of hydrogen. Reduction potential is defined as the ease with which an atom gains an electron. The reduction potential of sodium is less than that of hydrogen. This means hydrogen is released with more ease as compared to sodium. Due to which hydrogen gas is liberated in place of sodium metal at the anode. In this question the statement was, $Na$ is obtained by electrolysis of aqueous $NaCl$ solution.

This means the given statement is false.

Note:
In the electrolysis of aqueous solution water also participates in oxidation and reduction reactions. Therefore you may have more than one ion arriving at each electrode and there can be a choice over which ion gets discharged.