Malaria is transmitted by
(a)Male Culex
(b) Female Culex
(c) Male Anopheles
(d) Female Anopheles

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Hint: This insect belongs to the phylum Arthropoda and is solely responsible for the transmission of the disease called malaria. The insect was first described and named by J. W. Meigen in 1818.

Complete answer:
Malaria is transmitted by the female Anopheles mosquito. They transmit parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which cause malaria in humans. Mosquitoes belong to the other genera such as Aedes, Culex, Culiseta, Haemagogus, and Ochlerotatus can serve as vectors of disease agents, but not human malaria. Anopheles gambiae is mainly responsible for the transmission of the most dangerous species of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum into humans.

Additional Information:
Like all mosquitoes, anophelines undergo four stages in their life cycles: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. The first three stages are aquatic and together last 5–14 days, counting on the species and therefore the ambient temperature. The adult stage is when the feminine Anopheles mosquito acts as a malaria vector. The adult females can live up to a month or more in captivity, but most likely don't live quite a fortnight in nature. The process from egg-laying to the emergence of the adult is temperature-dependent, with a minimum time of seven days.
Egg: Adult females lay about 50–200 eggs that are quite small. Eggs are laid singly and directly on the water. They are unique in that they have floated on either side. Eggs hatch within 2–3 days and are not resistant to drying, even if hatching may take up to 2–3 weeks in colder climates.
Larva: The larva of a mosquito possesses a well-developed head with mouth brushed mouth used for feeding, a large thorax, and a nine-segment abdomen. Larvae breathe through the spiracles located on the eighth segment near the abdominal area.
Pupae: The pupa is comma-shaped also known as a tumbler. After surviving for a few days as a pupa, the dorsal surface of the cephalothorax splits and the pupa emerges as an adult mosquito. Generally, the pupal stage lasts for 2–3 days.
Adult: Males live for a few weeks, feeding on nectar and other sources of sugar. Males cannot feed on blood. Females also will prey on sugar sources for energy, but usually require a blood feed for the event of eggs. After obtaining an origin meal, the feminine will rest for a couple of days while the blood is digested and eggs are developed. Once the eggs are fully developed, the feminine lays them and resumes host-seeking. The cycle repeats, again and again, itself until the female dies.
So, the correct answer is option (d) ‘Female Anopheles’.

Note: Like all mosquitoes, anophelines undergo four stages in their life cycles: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.
The adult stage is when the feminine Anopheles mosquito acts as a malaria vector.
The process from egg-laying to the emergence of the adult is temperature-dependent, with a minimum time of seven days.
Males feed on nectar and other sources of sugar whereas females feed mainly on blood.