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Granulated zinc is made by:
A.pouring molten metal in water
B.pouring molten metal in molten nickel
C.displacing zinc from \[ZnS{O_4}\] solution
D.zone refining

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Last updated date: 19th Jul 2024
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Answer
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Hint: Zinc is a chemical element with atomic number 30 and the symbol Zn. At room temperature, zinc is a mildly brittle metal with a silvery-greyish colour as oxidation is removed. It is the first ingredient of the periodic table's group 12.

Complete answer:
Zinc granules are zinc metal particles with a large surface area and a small particle size. It is preferred for laboratory hydrogen gas preparation because it has a large surface area, which improves reaction efficiency. When it reacts with acids, it produces hydrogen gas, allowing the reaction to proceed more quickly. In the preparation of hydrogen, granulated zinc is favoured over metallic zinc because granulated zinc has a larger surface area exposed to the acid, allowing the reaction to proceed more quickly.
As molten zinc metal is dropped into water, it dissociates into small particles by reacting. Zinc granules are produced as water is added.

Hence option A is correct.

Additional information:
Granulated zinc is suitable for preparing hydrogen gas in chemical laboratories since it typically produces a small amount of copper, and can serve as a catalyst for the corresponding chemical reaction, increasing the rate of the reaction without actively intervening in it.

Note:
Zinc is a bluish-white, lustrous, diamagnetic metal with a dull finish in most popular commercial grades. It has a hexagonal crystal structure with a distorted form of hexagonal close packing, in which each atom has six nearest neighbours (at 265.9 pm) in its own plane and six others at a greater distance of 290.6 pm. It is somewhat less compact than iron and has a hexagonal crystal structure with a distorted form of hexagonal close packing, in which each atom has six nearest neighbours (at 265.9 pm) in its own plane and six others at a greater distance of 290.6 pm.