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How does normality differ from molarity?

seo-qna
Last updated date: 15th Jun 2024
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Answer
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Hint: The normality and molarity are the two quantitative methods applied to measure the concentration of solutes dissolved in the solvent to form the solution. The solution can be measured in terms of volume (Liters) or in mass (kilogram).

Complete step by step answer:
Molarity and normality are the two commonly used concentrations which are measured in two different approaches. Both molarity and normality are used as quantitative measures of the substance. Concentration is defined as the number of solutes dissolved in a solution.
Molarity is defined as the number of solute dissolved in one liter of solution. The molarity is measured in terms of moles per liter. The molarity is expressed as mol/L. It is denoted by “M”.
The formula to calculate the molarity is shown below.
$M = \dfrac{n}{V}$
Where,
M is the molarity
n is the number of moles.
V is the volume.
The normality is defined as the gram equivalent weight of solute per liter of solution. The gram equivalent weight is calculated by dividing the weight upon the equivalent weight. The unit of normality is Eq/L. It is denoted by “N”.
The formula to calculate the normality is shown below.
$N = \dfrac{{g.eq}}{V}$
Where,
N is the normality
g.eq is the gram equivalent
V is the volume.
The concentration in molarity is converted to normality by the formula shown below.
$N = M \times n$
Where,
N is the normality
M is the molarity
n is the number of equivalent

Note:
The relation between the molarity and normality is shown below.
$N = M \times \dfrac{m}{{Eq.m}}$
Where,
N is the normality
M is the molarity
m is the molecular weight
Eq.m is the equivalent mass or equivalent weight.