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Conversion of methyl chloride into methyl fluoride is known as:
A.Finkelstein Reaction
B.Swarts Reaction
C.Williamson’s synthesis
D.Wurtz Reaction

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Last updated date: 17th Jun 2024
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Answer
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Hint: Firstly, we must recall the above Name reactions by their statement simply and then we can answer this question very easily. When you will recall the statements of all the above reactions then the most relevant statement will be “When alkyl chloride or alkyl bromide reacts with transition metal fluorides, alkyl fluoride is obtained, then the reaction is called Swarts reaction.”

Complete Step by step answer: Step 1: The Finkelstein reaction is an organic reaction where an alkyl halide is converted into another alkyl halide by reacting with a metal halide salt. By this statement we can conclude that this is not the required reaction.
Step 2: In Swarts Reaction, when alkyl chloride or alkyl bromide is heated in presence of metallic fluoride (ex- $AgF$, $H{g_2}{F_2}$ , $Co{F_2}$​ etc.), then alkyl fluoride is produced. By this statement we can conclude that this is the required reaction.
Step 3: The Williamson ether synthesis is an organic reaction, forming an ether from an organohalide and a deprotonated alcohol (alkoxide). By this statement we can conclude that this is not the required reaction.
Step 4: The Wurtz reaction is a coupling reaction whereby two alkyl halides are reacted with sodium metal in dry ether solution to form a higher alkane. By this statement we can conclude that this is not the required reaction.

Hence the correct option is B.

Note: Swarts Reaction is generally used to get alkyl fluorides from alkyl chlorides or alkyl bromides. This is done by heating of the alkyl chloride/bromide in the presence of the fluoride of some heavy metals. The reaction will proceed if sodium fluoride or potassium fluoride is used, but the resulting yield will be significantly lower. This process was first reported by Frederic Jean Edmond Swarts in 1892.