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Examples of Mutations in Animals

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Last updated date: 02nd Mar 2024
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An Overview of Mutation

An organism's observable traits, or phenotype, may or may not change as a result of a mutation. Evolution, cancer, and the maturation of the immune system, including junctional variety, are among the normal and malignant biological processes in which mutations play a role. It is the change in the individual that occurs when a gene from one of its parent chromosomes fails to be copied into the next chromosome. Mutation is a very important part of the evolution process because it drives natural selection. Let’s now see more about Animal Mutations and some Examples of Mutations in Animals in detail.


What is Mutation?

A mutation is a change in an organism's, a virus's, or extrachromosomal DNA's nucleic acid sequence. DNA or RNA may be present in the viral genome. Mutations may be caused by mistakes in DNA replication, viral replication, mitosis, meiosis, or other types of DNA damage, like pyrimidine dimers from exposure to ultraviolet light. These errors can then lead to error-prone repair, particularly microhomology-mediated end joining, error-prone repair during other forms of repair, or even errors during replication (translation synthesis). Due to mobile genetic elements, mutations can also result from the insertion or deletion of DNA segments.


Examples of Mutations in Animals 

A mutation is a heritable alteration to a person's genetic makeup. Any size of the change is possible. The loss, addition, duplication, or rearrangement of entire chromosomes or chromosome parts constitutes large alterations. Evolution, cancer, and the maturation of the immune system, including junctional variety, are among the normal and malignant biological processes in which mutations play a role. All genetic variety originates from mutation, which also provides the basis for the action of evolutionary forces like natural selection. 


Animal Mutation

Sometimes during the prenatal development of an animal, an unexpected change can occur. These rare cases can be downright strange and can sometimes have quite a pretty effect. Sometimes these genetic abnormalities occur naturally and against all odds while in other cases these mutations are man-made and created specifically to achieve a noble goal. These man-made changes may be the result of selective breeding or, in fact, the organism changes at the genetic level. 


Regardless of the history or reasons for the unique characteristics of these animals, they are among the most well-known genetically mutated individuals in history. An eight-legged goat: In Croatia, a baby goat was born with a genetic abnormality that resulted in four extra legs. This is because one of the children absorbed one of his brothers or sisters in the womb. Farmer Zoran Papari told reporters that he first thought he would go crazy when he counted the baby's feet, so he had to invite the farmer's neighbour to confirm that he was not deceived with his eyes. The goat, most likely, did not live long, but the farmer planned to keep the animal as a pet if the goat survived.


Animal Mutation


Animal Mutation


Example of Beneficial Mutant 

Trichromatic vision, lactose tolerance, and HIV resistance are a few examples of advantageous mutations. There are numerous well-known instances of advantageous mutations. Here are only a couple: Many bacteria have mutations that enable them to endure antibiotic treatment. Bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics result from mutations. In a small Italian town, inhabitants have a rare mutation. one that enables a rabbit to conceal itself from predators by changing its colour. A dog's tail is born shorter than it should be due to a mutation.


Beneficial Mutant


Beneficial Mutant


Summary

To conclude all the conceptual understanding regarding mutations in this article, we can say that Mutation is defined as a dynamic chemical change in the genetic material of a species. These changes arise in the structure and number of chromosomes. Mutations occur naturally that are made by random errors during cellular reproduction and they are not due to environmental pressures as many fear. They can also be man-made sometimes. Therefore, from this point of view, the change in the molecular structure of a gene is called "gene mutation". We hope you enjoyed reading this article, in case of any other doubts, feel free to ask in the comments.

FAQs on Examples of Mutations in Animals

1. Which mutations are advantageous?

A sort of mutation known as a "beneficial mutation" benefits an organism. Although uncommon, these mutations are important. A favorable mutation benefits the organism, which is handed down from generation to generation, increasing the likelihood that the children will survive. There are numerous well-known instances of advantageous mutations. Here are only a couple: Many bacteria have mutations that enable them to endure antibiotic treatment. Bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics result from mutations. In a small Italian town, inhabitants have a rare mutation.

2. What are the characteristics of mutations?

A mutation is a change in a genetic sequence. Mutations include minor changes in the form of a DNA building block or the replacement of a nucleotide base by another nucleotide base. Meanwhile, large mutations can affect multiple genes on a chromosome. Genetically, by figuring out how it is inherited, where on the chromosome it is located, and whether or not it complements any other colocalizing mutations that have been identified and cause comparable symptoms.

3. What drawbacks do mutations have?

Cancer or genetic illnesses can originate from dangerous mutations. A condition brought on by changes in one or more genes is referred to as a genetic disorder. Cystic fibrosis is a human example. Gene mutations result in the body producing thick, sticky mucus that obstructs digestive organ ducts and clogs the lungs. For the most part, mutations have no discernible impact on the organisms in which they arise. Natural selection may increase the frequency of advantageous mutations.