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Famous Scientists for Kids

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Last updated date: 29th Feb 2024
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Introduction

Not all history's most influential scientists began their careers as college graduates. History is littered with scientists who shaped the world as teenagers. Many things we take for granted today might not exist if they were ignored solely because of their age. These teenagers impacted the world far more than they realised long after their deaths, thanks to their determination and thirst for knowledge.


Scientists and Their Inventions for Kids

Andre Marie Ampere

André-Marie Ampère was a well-known French physicist and mathematician regarded as one of the forefathers of classical electromagnetism, also known as "electrodynamics." He was the creator of the solenoid and the electrical telegraph.


Andre Marie Ampere
 


Andre Marie Ampere


An electrical telegraph was a point-to-point text messaging system used from the 1840s until the late twentieth century when other telecommunication systems gradually phased it out. Switches at the sending station connected a current source to the telegraph wires.


Archimedes

Archimedes is famous for inventing machines that helped the Romans win the Punic Wars. With his inventions, Archimedes helped to prevent Rome from attacking Syracuse. For example, "The Claw of Archimedes," which is thought to be a claw that lifted enemy ships out of the water and destroyed them, was invented by Archimedes.


Archimedes


Archimedes


John Logie Baird

He was born in Helensburgh, a coastal town in Argyll. He was a brilliant electrical engineer, inventor, and trailblazer. In 1926, he was in charge of the first live working television system. He also created the first colour television system aimed at the general public.


John Logie Baird


John Logie Baird


Alexander Graham Bell

Alexander Graham Bell is nicely known as the telephone inventor but also created other devices. For example, Bell invented several sonic devices, including the photophone (1880) and the Graphophone (1886). He also made advances in medical technology.


Alexander Graham Bell


Alexander Graham Bell


Niels Bohr

Niels Bohr proposed a thesis for the hydrogen atom in 1913, based on quantum theory, which states that some physical quantities can only have discrete values. For example, electrons move around a nucleus in specific orbits, and if they jump to a lower-energy orbit, the difference is emitted as radiation.


Niels Bohr


Niels Bohr


Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson was a well-known American biologist who wrote about environmental pollution and the natural history of the sea. Silent Spring (1962), one of her most influential books in the modern environmental movement, provided the impetus for tighter pesticide control, including DDT.


Rachel Carson


Rachel Carson


Francis Crick

Francis Crick (1916-2004) was a great British scientist. He is known for his cooperation with James Watson, which resulted in the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953, building on the work of Maurice Wilkins, Rosalind Franklin, and others.


Francis Crick


Francis Crick


Thomas Edison

Thomas Alva Edison, dubbed "America's greatest inventor," is best known for inventions including the incandescent light bulb, phonograph, motion picture camera, the phone and the telephone, and telegraph upgrades.


Thomas Edison


Thomas Edison


Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein was a theoretical physicist. Although Einstein is best known for developing the theory of relativity, he also contributed significantly to the development of quantum mechanics.


Albert Einstein


Albert Einstein


Alexander Fleming

Alexander Fleming was born in Lochfield, Scotland, on August 6, 1881. He studied medicine at London University's Saint Mary's Hospital Medical School. After finishing his degree, he began researching substances that kill bacteria (microorganisms responsible for causing some diseases).


Alexander Fleming


Alexander Fleming


Solved Questions

1. Andre Marie Ampere came from where?

a) France  b) England  c) Scotland

Ans: a) France

 

2. What principle did Archimedes discover?

a) Principle of Volume b) Principle of Density c) Principle of Buoyancy

Ans: c) Principle of Buoyancy

 

3. What was the identity of John Logie Baird?

a) A Scottish engineer   b) An American socialite  c) A British king

Ans: a) A Scottish engineer 

FAQs on Famous Scientists for Kids

1. What are the responsibilities of a scientist?

Scientists must conduct and disseminate their research with excellence, honesty, respect, fairness, reliability, clarity, and transparency for the sake of society.

2. Describe scientific thought.

Asking questions, testing hypotheses, making observations, spotting patterns, and drawing conclusions are all examples of scientific thinking, which involves deliberate information searching.

3. Which two categories best describe scientific research?

Below stated are some of the scientific research methods:

  • Basic or fundamental research: Basic research is an examination into the fundamental ideas and causes behind a specific event, process, or phenomenon.

  • Applied research: Research that is applied involves using established theories and concepts to address specific issues.