Which of the given statements are true?
Disaster management is essential because:
They have huge effects on humans and the environment.
Disasters are inevitable.
A) Only A
B) Only B
C) Both A and B
D) None of these

Answer
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Hint:
A disaster is a genuine disruption happening over a short or extensive stretch of time that causes inescapable human, material, a financial, or ecological misfortune that surpasses the capacity of the influenced network or society to adapt utilizing its own assets.

Complete step by step solution:
Disaster, as characterized by the United Nations, is a serious interruption of the working of a network or society, which includes inescapable human, material, financial or ecological effects that surpass the capacity of the influential network or society to adapt utilizing its own assets. Natural disasters are naturally happening phenomenons caused either by fast or moderate beginning occasions which can be geophysical (tremors, avalanches, tsunamis, and volcanic movement), hydrological (torrential slides and floods), climatological (extraordinary temperatures, dry season, and fierce wildfires), meteorological (typhoons and storms/wave floods) or biological (pandemics and plagues).
 Disaster management is how we manage the human, material, financial or ecological effects of a said calamity, it is the cycle of how we "plan for, react to and gain from the impacts of significant disappointments". Even though regularly brought about commonly, calamities can have human starting points. Pandemic is a plague of compelling disease that has spread over an enormous district, which can happen to the human people or animal people and may impact prosperity and upset organizations advancing monetary and social costs. Pandemic Emergencies may happen as an outcome of common or man-made disasters. These are inevitable.

Thus, option (C) is correct.

Note:
Catastrophe Management can be characterized as the association and the executives of assets and obligations regarding managing all philanthropic parts of crises, specifically readiness, reaction, and recuperation to diminish the effect of debacles.