Courses
Courses for Kids
Free study material
Offline Centres
More
Store Icon
Store

Torr is the unit of a physical quantity
(a) density
(b) pressure
(c) torque
(d) none

seo-qna
Last updated date: 22nd Jul 2024
Total views: 347.7k
Views today: 3.47k
Answer
VerifiedVerified
347.7k+ views
Hint: Try to conclude all the definitions of the given physical quantities in the options as well as their units. Thereafter, it can be easier to find the required unit of which of these physical quantities.
Note that some physical quantities are also measured on an absolute scale. Hence they also can have absolute scale-based units. For example, the temperature has an absolute scale-based unit namely Kelvin.

Complete step-by-step solution:
Let us start with the definition of the given physical quantities with their normal and absolute scale-based units.
Density: density is the mass of an object per unit volume.
$density(D) = \dfrac{{mass(M)}}{{volume(V)}}$
Its unit is based on the unit of mass and volume i.e. $gm/c{m^3}$ or $kg/{m^3}$
Pressure: Pressure is the amount of exerted force per unit area.
$pressure(P) = \dfrac{{force(F)}}{{area(A)}}$
Its unit is $dyne/c{m^2}$ or $newton/{m^2}$
Pressure also has an absolute scale-based unit called Torr.
The torr (symbol: Torr) could be a unit of pressure based on an absolute scale i.e Kelvin scale, outlined as precisely 1760 of a standard atmosphere (101325 Pa). so one millimeter of mercury is strictly 101325760 pascals (≈ 133.32 Pa).
Torque: torque is the amount of force that is applied to an object that can rotate the object. The units of torque are $dyne - cm$ or $newton - meter$.
So, Torr is the unit of Pressure.
Option (b) is the correct answer.

Note: An absolute scale is a system of measure, begins at a minimum, or numerical quantity, and progresses in just one direction. absolute temperature scale differs from associate arbitrary, or "relative", scale, that begins at some purpose designated by an individual and may progress in each direction. The absolute temperature scale begins at a natural minimum, going only 1 direction within which to progress.