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RD Sharma Class 8 Solutions Chapter 24 - Graphical Representation of Data As Histograms (Ex 24.1) Exercise 24.1

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IVSAT 2024

RD Sharma Class 8 Solutions Chapter 24 - Graphical Representation of Data As Histograms (Ex 24.1) Exercise 24.1 - Free PDF

Free PDF download of RD Sharma Class 8 Solutions Chapter 24 - Graphical Representation of Data As Histograms Exercise 24.1 solved by Expert Mathematics Teachers on Vedantu.com. All Chapter 24 - Graphical Representation of Data As Histograms Ex 24.1 Questions with Solutions for RD Sharma Class 8 Maths to help you to revise complete syllabus and score more marks. Register for online coaching for IIT JEE (Mains & Advanced) and other Engineering Entrance Exams.

Chapter 24 - Histogram

A Histogram is a Graph consisting of a series of Rectangles with bases and intervals between Class boundaries. The thing which these rectangles represent is Data and all these Rectangles are inter-connected. Rectangle heights are proportional to the corresponding Frequencies of similar and different Classes. The Bar Graph below, for Example, depicts Data on people's preferences for a particular sport.


What exactly is a Histogram?

Graphical representation of Data is known to have many types and one of them is a Histogram. Here, the vertical Bars represent the continuous number ranges of Data.

  • The horizontal axis consists of the number range.

  • The vertical axis portrays the amount of Data (frequency) in each range.

The Data that is used determines the number ranges.


A Histogram Graph is a Data representation in the form of a Bar Graph. It's a diagram that divides a set of outcomes into columns along the x-axis. The y-axis represents the number count or multiple occurrences in the Data for each column in the same Histogram. It is the most straightforward method for visualising Data distributions. Let's learn about the Histogram Graph by making one for the Example below.


Yash has a mango grove with 20 trees. The trees are all different heights. 61, 62, 64, 66, 68, 69, 71.5, 72.5, 73.5, 74.5, 75, 76.2, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 84, 87. In a frequency distribution table, we can group the Data as follows by setting a range:


Height range

Number of trees (frequency)

60-65

3

66-70

3

71-75

5

76-80

5

81-85

3

86-90

1

A Histogram can now be used to display this information. We need to make sure that there are no gaps between the Bars when plotting a Histogram.


How is a Histogram made?

The following steps will guide you through the process of creating a Histogram with the Data you've provided:


Step 1: Select a suitable horizontal axis scale to represent weights.


Step 2: On the vertical axis, select a suitable scale to represent the frequencies.


Step 3: Using the frequencies, draw the Bars that correspond to each of the given weights.


Shapes of Histogram

The frequency distribution of the Data can be used to Classify the Histogram into different types. Normal Distribution, Skewed Distribution, Bimodal Distribution, Multimodal Distribution, Comb Distribution, Edge Peak Distribution, Dog Food Distribution, Heart Cut Distribution, and so on are all Examples of distributions. These various types of distributions can be represented using the Histogram. There are five basic types of Histogram shapes. They are as follows:

  • Skewed Left Histogram

  • Skewed right Histogram

  • Bimodal Histogram

  • Uniform Histogram

  • Bell Histogram

FAQs on RD Sharma Class 8 Solutions Chapter 24 - Graphical Representation of Data As Histograms (Ex 24.1) Exercise 24.1

1. Explain the different shapes of the Histogram.

There are five shapes of the Histogram which have been mentioned below:

  • Bell-Shaped: A single peak can be found in a bell-shaped Histogram.

  • Bimodal: The term "bimodal Histogram" refers to a Histogram with two peaks.

  • Right Skewed: A right-skewed Histogram is skewed to the right. The Bars of the Histogram are skewed to the right in this Histogram.

  • Left Skewed: A Histogram that is skewed to the left is known as a skewed left Histogram. The Bars of the Histogram are skewed to the left in this Histogram.

  • Uniform: A uniform Histogram is one in which all of the Bars are roughly the same height.

2. What is the difference between a Bar chart from a Histogram?

The main difference between Histograms and Bar Graphs is that Bars in a Bar Graph are not adjacent to each other. And the other is written down below.

  • Bar Graph: A Bar Graph is a Graphical representation of categorical Data made up of rectangular Bars whose length is proportional to the value represented.

  • Histogram: A Histogram is a Graphical representation of Data in which the Data is divided into continuous number ranges, each of which is represented by a vertical Bar.

3. Are there some tricks for making a Histogram?

Listed below are some tricks to make a Histogram:

  • When drawing a Histogram, choose the scale on the vertical axis and look for the highest number that divides all the frequencies. If there isn't one, look for the highest number that divides the majority of the frequencies.

  • A Histogram is a Graph that shows how continuous Data is summarised.

  • The visual interpretation of continuous Data is provided by a Histogram.

  • The horizontal and vertical axes' scales do not have to begin at zero.

  • A Histogram's Bars should not have any gaps between them.

4. What is the difference between skewed right and skewed left Histogram?

A long left tail characterises a left-skewed Histogram. Negatively skewed Histograms are also known as left-skewed Histograms because of their long tail in the negative direction on the number line.  Moreover, the mean is on the left of the peak.


The right tail of a right-skewed Histogram is long. Positive-skew Histograms are also known as right-skewed Histograms because of their long tail in the positive direction on the number line. In addition, the mean is to the right of the peak.

5. How to draw a Histogram?

  • Mark the Class intervals on the X-axis and the frequencies on the Y-axis to get started.

  • Both axes' scales must be the same.

  • Intervals between Classes must be exclusive.

  • Draw rectangles with the bases representing the Class range and the heights representing the frequencies associated with those intervals.

  • Because the Class limits are marked on the horizontal axis and the frequencies are indicated on the vertical axis, each Class interval is represented by a rectangle.

  • If the intervals are equal, the height of each rectangle is proportional to the corresponding Class frequency.