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At geomagnetic pole, a magnetic needle allowed to rotate in horizontal plane will
(A) stay in north-south direction only
(B) stay in any position
(C) stay in east-west direction only
(D) become rigid showing no movement

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Last updated date: 22nd Feb 2024
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Answer
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Hint: We know that according to this site Magnetic North, Geomagnetic and Magnetic Poles. The Geomagnetic poles (dipole poles) are the intersections of the Earth's surface and the axis of a bar magnet hypothetically placed at the center of the Earth by which we approximate the geomagnetic field. A magnetic field is a vector field that describes the magnetic influence on moving electric charges, electric currents, and magnetized materials. A charge that is moving in a magnetic field experiences a force perpendicular to its own velocity and to the magnetic field. The effects of magnetic fields are commonly seen in permanent magnets, which pull on magnetic materials such as iron, and attract or repel other magnets.

Complete step by step answer
We know that the pole's horizontal component of earth's magnetic field is zero therefore, if the needle is held horizontally then it will stay in any position.
The South Geomagnetic Pole is the point where the axis of this best-fitting tilted dipole intersects the Earth's surface in the southern hemisphere. As of 2005 it was calculated to be located at $79.74^{\circ} \mathrm{S} 108.22^{\circ} \mathrm{E}$, near the Vostok Station. Because the Earth's actual magnetic field is not an exact dipole.
Because the Earth's actual magnetic field is not an exact dipole, the (calculated) North and South Magnetic Poles do not coincide with the North and South Magnetic Poles. If the Earth's magnetic fields were exactly dipolar, the north pole of a magnetic compass needle would point directly at the North Geomagnetic Pole.
Since Earth's magnetic field is not exactly symmetrical, the North and South Magnetic Poles are not antipodal, meaning that a straight line drawn from one to the other does not pass through the geometric center of Earth.

So, the correct option is option B.

Note: We know that a magnetic field is a vector field that describes the magnetic influence on moving electric charges, electric currents, and magnetized materials. A charge that is moving in a magnetic field experiences a force perpendicular to its own velocity and to the magnetic field. The definition of a magnetic field is a place in space near a magnet or an electric current where a physical field is created from a moving electric charge that creates force on another moving electric charge. An example of a magnetic field is the Earth's magnetic field. The magnetic field is generated by electric currents due to the motion of convection currents of a mixture of molten iron and nickel in the Earth's outer core: these convection currents are caused by heat escaping from the core, a natural process called a geodynamic.